Creationism In Louisiana

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kg
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Creationism In Louisiana

Post by kg »


I was unsure which sub-forum to post this in, but since it involves legislation (though limited to Louisiana, with similar legislation in Tennessee), I decided on this forum.

At the outset, I find it comforting that there are young people who are taking up the mantle of activism:

For Zack Kopplin, it all started back in 2008 with the passing of the Louisiana Science Education Act. The bill made it considerably easier for teachers to introduce creationist textbooks into the classroom. Outraged, he wrote a research paper about it for a high school English class....

Kopplin, who is studying history at Rice University, had good reason to be upset after the passing of the LSEA — an insidious piece of legislation that allows teachers to bring in their own supplemental materials when discussing politically controversial topics like evolution or climate change. Soon after the act was passed, some of his teachers began to not just supplement existing texts, but to rid the classroom of established science books altogether. It was during the process to adopt a new life science textbook in 2010 that creationists barraged Louisiana's State Board of Education with complaints about the evidence-based science texts. Suddenly, it appeared that they were going to be successful in throwing out science textbooks.

19-year-old activist Zack Kopplin is making life hell for Louisiana’s creationists

I found the article well written, and most of the points made well-founded. This is another example of politics gone awry, with special interest groups pushing the boundaries set by the Constitution of the United States.

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brandtrn
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Re: Creationism In Louisiana

Post by brandtrn »

Good for young Mr. Kopplin! I have no problem with folks teaching their children any sort of religious and/or fairy stories that they wish them to learn...but public schools are NOT the place for such things to be taught! It's hard enough to prepare our children for life in the "real" world as it is...do we REALLY need our public schools pushing such "information" into our childrens' minds when it's damn difficult, it seems (for many people, anyway), to have them reading and writing at an acceptable level by the time they finish high school?

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Re: Creationism In Louisiana

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That is a definite concern, unless all religious beliefs receive equal exposure (and I'm sure you're aware of how likely that is!), but of even greater concern is the fact that the teachers were pushing for the removal of science-based textbooks from the classroom. Not only is that completely unacceptable, but counterproductive as a substitute for, or even an alternative to, science in an educational environment!

As was said in the article...

But what also drives Kopplin is the inherent danger he sees in teaching creationism.

"Creationism confuses students about the nature of science," he says. "If students don't understand the scientific method, and are taught that creationism is science, they will not be prepared to do work in genuine fields, especially not the biological sciences. We are hurting the chances of our students having jobs in science, and making discoveries that will change the world."

He worries that, if Louisiana (and Tennessee, which also has a similar law) insists on teaching students creationism, students will not be the ones discover the cure to AIDS or cancer. "We won't be the ones to repair our own damaged wetlands and protect ourselves from more hurricanes like Katrina," he says.

Moreover, he's also concerned that teaching creationism will harm economic development.

"Just search creationism on Monster Jobs or Career Builder and tell me how many creationist jobs you find," he asks. Kopplin tells us about how this past Spring, Kevin Carman, the former Dean of LSU's College School of Science (now the Executive Vice President and Provost for the University of Nevada, Reno) testified in the Louisiana Senate Education Committee about how he had lost researchers and scientists to other states because of the Louisiana Science Education Act.


As I said, unacceptable, especially for the young people in Louisiana. Religion should be taught in the home, church, and private (non-public funded) schools, not in the public schools, where it forces everyone and sundry to learn and comply with one religion's tenets and belief systems.

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Re: Creationism In Louisiana

Post by pilvikki »

    well, to be honest, creation fables should not be taught as facts anywhere. i mean, wtf, how do you explain that? and if you brainwash kids into believing in that, what else can you have them swallow?

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