Traffic Laws [split]

Brainformation is about the information in your brain and the way it's perceived. This forum specialize in the exchange of ideas and thoughts that do not fit into our special interests categories.
User avatar
Kellemora
Brainiac Class Poster
Brainiac Class Poster
Posts: 3389
Joined: 07 Jul 2012, 18:52
Location: From St. Louis, current Knoxville, TN
Contact:

Traffic Laws [split]

Post by Kellemora »

Out of the clear blue sky, I had an e-mail from a former employee I haven't heard from since I moved south.
He popped up on Farcebook talking to another former employee, who I talk to all the time, and saw a few messages from me. I did see his comments, but he never addressed me directly.
He was one of our drivers, and hated the route I put him on. Which should have been the easiest for him to run.
I didn't learn why he hated it, because he never told me. I would have been glad to give him the route further out, if he would have just told me why. He had more seniority than the guy running the far route, which is who usually gets the further away runs. One of his friends is who mentioned casually to me, he was surprised I put him on that route, but all he knew was our driver hated that area with a passion.
The Monday morning after this conversation, I asked the driver if he would prefer the southeast route. He said he would love it, so I switched the two drivers routes. The far driver thought he got a promotion, hi hi...
I never did learn the true reason he hated that area, other than even though he lived in the area, the zone crossed into a rival school district, but I'm sure there is much more to it than that.

We had another driver who flat out refused to deliver inside the city limits of a small river town. He liked his route, and handled it faster than anyone else. It was easy enough for me to add this area to another route, by a driver who actually liked getting more stops added to his run.
In this case, I learned why. The guy could not go into that town without getting a bogus ticket for something. From the age of 16 to 19, he amassed over 40 tickets, only a couple did he do something wrong. He claimed most were trumped up, and some really impossible. He's never had a ticket anywhere else, and was an excellent driver. I know because I would follow our drivers on occasion to see how they drive, and especially if they are courteous on the road or not. Our company name is on those vehicles!

I'll give an example of three of his tickets, all earned within an hour.
He crosses the river bridge leading into town. Before he makes it as far as the intersection where the first stop sign is located, a cop pulls out and stops him for running a boulevard stop. He never saw a stop sign, it must be new, because there has never been a stop sign before you reach the first intersection. Why would there be?
He takes the ticket and backs up on the shoulder to see where this stop sign might be. The only logical place would be the side street the cop came out of. Nope, no stop sign there.
So he pulls onto the road and proceeds back to the intersection. A cop pulls him over and writes him a ticket for backing down the road. He wasn't on the road, he was on the shoulder. Where did this cop come from anyhow?
He decides he's going to find out where this stop sign is, so he turns around, crosses the bridge, turns around and comes back across the bridge. Nobody behind him so he slows down looking for a stop sign. He doesn't see one, and proceeds on to the intersection. Here comes the first cop that wrote him a ticket, giving him another one for running a boulevard stop sign.
This time he asked the cop to show him the stop sign he is claimed to have run.
The cop is glad to oblige him, and they walk on foot up the shoulder of the road, almost to the bridge, right before reaching the side street on the left.
Yep, there is a stop sign there, about twenty feet up in the air. Well above the legal height for a stop sign.
The cop says the ordinance allowed them to install it that high, so it could be seen before you hit the downhill slope at the end of the bridge.
Trouble is, there is a BIG SIGN on the Bridge itself that blocks the view of this stop sign from the bridge. Once you start down the downhill side, it's above the roof of your car. A TRAP for sure, because no one in front of him that lives in that town ever stops at that stop sign.

Same way with another stop sign at a three way intersection. Big Red Stop Sign, it even has a sign under it saying Right Turn Need Not Stop. He comes down the road, veers right at the Y and sure enough, another cop came out of his bumper and wrote him a ticket for running the stop sign. I went right he told the cop. Cop says, no you went straight. It's a Y intersection, I went right at the Y. That's the same as going straight says the cop. He goes back around to see where someone could make a right turn. Sure enough, there is a little one-way blacktop lane that looks like a driveway, on the other side of a hedge, almost invisible unless you knew it was there. You can make a right turn onto this one-way, one-lane blacktop road, which takes you to a larger street, without going around the school just beyond the Y intersection. Another TRAP?

Oh, almost forgot, here is a good one. At one of the major roads through town, where a side street joins the main road between two building, with very reduced visibility. The city installed an electric stoplight, that never changes UNLESS someone is trying to get out of the side street. But there is a TRICK to triggering the stop light.
After you cross the train tracks, you have to pull to edge of the right lane and pass under a street lamp slowly, so a sensor picks up your car. Now if you look at this street, you have a narrow lane crossing the track, which widens right after the tracks, to almost two lanes wide. So naturally, anyone planning on turning left at the light would move to the left side of the lane. By doing so, it will not trigger the light. Right turn on red is allowed, so folks going right never swing over to the right edge of the road after crossing the tracks.
He sat, and sat, and sat, waiting for the light to turn red. It never did. After about ten minutes, and with no cars coming, he makes his left turn, running the red light. You guessed it, another cop pops out of his bumper and writes him a ticket. At least this cop told him to make a left he must slow down under the sensor, if the light don't change, then he should make a right instead.

I don't blame the guy for refusing to go into this small town for any reason anymore...

TTUL
Gary

User avatar
Ice.Maiden
Guardian Angel
Guardian Angel
Posts: 70045
Joined: 14 Aug 2009, 23:31
Location: Peak District

Re: Human Obsolescence

Post by Ice.Maiden »

Oh dear!!! LOOOL!!! You have some fun and games with your police officers don't you! It's not bad to amass 40 tickets in 3 years though Gary (joke!). The poor guy must hold the record for it!!

User avatar
Kellemora
Brainiac Class Poster
Brainiac Class Poster
Posts: 3389
Joined: 07 Jul 2012, 18:52
Location: From St. Louis, current Knoxville, TN
Contact:

Re: Human Obsolescence

Post by Kellemora »

I didn't mention the name of the town, lest I get killed, hi hi...
However, I think I mentioned in a previous post about another similar town.
The city of Marlborough. The city council and police were so corrupt, that the state came in and shut down their police department.
Looking back on those years, and looking around at law enforcement today, in comparison, Marlborough wasn't all that bad. I see much worse things going on today, and by the states themselves too.

Did I ever tell you about the tickets a bunch of us guys got at school from a new rookie cop?
Normally, a cop cannot come on private property to write a moving traffic violation that occurs on the private property. Unless the owner of that property has authorized them to enforce certain laws. E.g. like on a shopping center parking lot. Only in this case, it was on a high school parking lot.

Put muscle cars and boys together after school on an empty parking lot, and you can expect that a few of us are going to repave the lot with a new rubber surface coating. Aka the rubber off our tires.

In times past, a few got tickets which were enforceable, because they were written concerning noise. Excessive muffler noise, or noise from the squealing tires. But laws pertaining to traffic on the roadways is not enforceable on private property.

In any case, we would light up our tires on the hill leading out of the parking lot up to the road, or down on the parking lot itself racing each other back and forth.
This new cop thought he hit a gold mine, and just sat jotting down the license plate numbers of every car he saw burning rubber and racing around on the parking lot. When he had enough of them, he pulled up blocking the exit to the parking lot, and commenced to writing out his tickets for each of us.
He couldn't remember the ordinance number, because there was none.
So he figured if he just described the offense on the ticket, the judge would understand.

He got about 20 of us that day, and we all appeared in court two or three weeks later. We could not prepay these tickets without an ordinance number, hi hi... Although none of us would anyhow, because we knew he had no jurisdiction there.
The judge handled a couple of other cases first, then when he came to the stack of tickets for us, he just looked at them and shook his head.
He called each of us by name and told us to stand, but not to come to the rail. About 1/3 of us in the courtroom were standing.
He gave us a half hour long lecture about safety. Since some of the kids had other tickets to handle, he said "Those who are here ONLY for a ticket stating "Speeding While In A Stationary Position" see the clerk, "No Fine or Court Costs" will be levied against you, this time.
Almost everyone in the court room busted out in laughter when they heard what we were charged with!

Here is one to consider. It is illegal to cut through private property to avoid an intersection.
Does this count when it is your OWN driveway, or a private drive you are part owner of that runs between two streets past four houses on the private drive?
Before you answer, is this not how most of the streets in our country came to be in the first place?
Rather than driving all the way to the state or county owned roads, a road built by the farmers to get to their houses, may run between two state or county owned roads. As these roads became more heavily traveled, the farmers turned them over to the state or county to maintain.


I think you will be surprised at the answer.


The law is the law is the law. It is illegal to cut through private property to avoid an intersection.

This law was originally written to stop people from cutting through corner gas station lots or store lots. You still see it happen all the time today. Sometimes it is enforced, but often it is not.

Ready for the answer?

Is using a private drive connecting two streets considered avoiding an intersection?

YES IT IS! Because the law does not define a corner lot, nor the length of the private property traversed.

Now, let's add another twist to this. Suppose a farmer builds a subdivision for his children at the far corner of his property. This subdivision has two public entrances, off the two streets bordering two of its boundary lines.
A private driveway runs the entire length of the farm, from the main road south of the farm to the subdivision.
Those who work on the farm, use this drive to get to and from work. They also use this drive when leaving work to go to the stores out on the main road south of the farm.
So far, they have done nothing illegal.

OK, after they leave the stores and turn onto the driveway off the main road. IF they continue on this road to their home in the subdivision, they are now in violation of the law. The subdivision streets whether publicly are privately maintained, are considered public streets. And you cut through private property to get from one main road to another street. Same as cutting through private property to avoid an intersection.
Just because you live and work on the property makes no difference.

It's the same as a car blocking your driveway. It doesn't matter if it is your own car blocking your own driveway. It is illegal to block a driveway. Period. So if you just retarred your blacktop, use orange cones, not your car to make sure no one drives on it.

TTUL
Gary

User avatar
Ice.Maiden
Guardian Angel
Guardian Angel
Posts: 70045
Joined: 14 Aug 2009, 23:31
Location: Peak District

Re: Human Obsolescence

Post by Ice.Maiden »

Hi Gary.

Well first of all, our parking laws seem to be different to yours. We can park outside our own driveways providing the said drive doesn't back out straight onto a major road. However, even there, it depends on local rules. Some properties don't have a driveway, therefore necessitating that vehicles stand on the road as close to the house as possible. With terraced or cottage properties that come straight out onto a lane, the vehicles can park on the grass verge, providing that it doesn't obstruct pedestrians from having access to a path. Therefore, some stand half on the road and half on the verge, which gives room for people walking by plus room for cars to move along the road.

We can park outside another person's property providing that it's not in front of a dropped kerb, denoting a private driveway or disabled parking spot.

Farm tracks're slightly different. It'd be difficult to drive up one to reach a main junction over here, as almost all have private properties at the top, usually with gates to bar further entrance. These tracks must be left free for farm vehicles to go up and down and for the owner to gain access either way.

Not far from us, there's a private road with dwellings on either side. The road actually belongs to the residents, who have to club together to maintain it if necessary (they don't bother!). However, maybe a mile up the hill, private farm land's now been turned into a residential area, and there's only this one road leading up to it, so obviously, any vehicles can use this road, but I've no idea what'd happen if the bumpy surface damaged the cars, since the Council doesn't own the lane, and boundaries for each occupant haven't been marked out.

As with over there, you can't use private property to avoid a longer journey, but in truthfulness, this'd be difficult anyway, as most private roads just lead up to the owner's house. Second or third exits may be at the back or side of the property, but wouldn't take a car anywhere but onto the owner's land.

I had to laugh at the court rules, especially: "Those who are here ONLY for a ticket stating "Speeding While In A Stationary Position" see the clerk". LOL!!!

Youngsters burning rubber isn't a new trend, but we get the odd boy racers on major roads. Most drivers given the option to join in just shake their heads and wave the others ahead. You don't get too much of it going off on private property because of the expense of replacing tyres and other parts! To be honest, those who haven't passed their driving tests might be tempted. They're usually uninsured as well, and the law comes down heavily on anyone found to be without it, but some hot-heads'll have a go. Most other kids who do everything legally're pretty proud of their first cars and don't participate in these sort of games. The problem comes once they feel confident and start to put their foot down. They sometimes don't anticipate a tyre blowing, or a person/animal coming out in front of them. Neither do they anticipate sharp bends which they're not used to, despite hazard signs. Most road deaths occur with drivers under the age of 25, but that probably happens everywhere else as well.
Last edited by Ice.Maiden on 15 Aug 2014, 11:30, edited 1 time in total.

User avatar
Kellemora
Brainiac Class Poster
Brainiac Class Poster
Posts: 3389
Joined: 07 Jul 2012, 18:52
Location: From St. Louis, current Knoxville, TN
Contact:

Re: Human Obsolescence

Post by Kellemora »

We are not allowed to park on any unpaved areas back home.
Down here is a different story. Seems you can park as many cars as you want in your front yard all the time.

You wouldn't believe all the nit-picky things you can get ticketed for back home.

The day they were resurfacing the street, many of us parked our cars partway on the driveway with two wheels on the grass so we could fit them all off the street. All of us who had a car with tires touching grass got a ticket.

Even if you have a gravel pull-off next to a shoulder, if one exists. If you let grass grow in the driveway, it is considered grass and you get ticketed.

Ruth got a ticket once on the way home from work. She pulled the grocery store lot, planning to pick up dinner, but was running late and the food service end was already closed. She left the grocery store lot by the side entrance, which still took her back up to the main road, and the traffic light.
Some cop saw her pull in off the main road, and exit by the side road. Normally if you were avoiding an intersection, you would turn right out of the side exit, not left up to the stoplight.
He wrote her a ticket anyhow, using the ordinance number for cutting through private property to avoid an intersection. She decided to go to court over it, because she did NOT avoid the intersection with what she did. The judge saw it her way and found her not guilty, so she didn't have to pay anything. Other than the time to appear in court. She was actually lucky. There is another ordinance for short-cutting through private property, that does not have the 'to avoid intersection' part. But I think it has some other clause for it's intended purpose, so may not have fit the situation.

Back when I first started driving, the cost for soft rubber tires was a negligible expense. Gas was 34 cents per gallon, less than 5 bucks for a fill-up, and that included getting the windshield washed, radiator and oil checked, air pressure in the tires checked, and four brand new tires, mounted and balanced was under 80 bucks. I usually opted for a better grade of soft tire, like Uniroyal Tiger Paws, which were still under a 100 bucks for all four, mounted and balanced. Only about three or four years ago, they were only up to like 250 bucks for all four, but the price climbed sharply these last few years. It now costs over a grand to get four soft rubber tires, if you can find them, and close to two grand for hazardous hard rubber tires.

Mechanics who worked at car dealers LOVED to see me come in to buy a new car, because it meant they could fight over who got the new tires off my new car. Nearly every new car had super hard rubber tires, like Michelin's, and I wouldn't drive the car off the lot with such dangerous tires on them. If I ordered a car from the factory, they usually came with the tires I wanted, but not always, so I made them change them out for what I did want.

I know I mentioned proving how bad they were to someone using Venture stores parking lot as the test track.
Poor guy slid all the way into the dirt embankment at the far end of the parking lot. Made a believer out of him for sure.

I don't pay attention to most statistics, mainly because they are so inaccurate or heavily biased by not including the major contributing factors. 99 times out of 100 they will blame speed for something, when it was not in any way a contributing factor to the incident.
Relating to what I just mentioned in the paragraph above. You can take two identical cars, everything exactly the same, except the tires. Send them both around the same curve on wet blacktop. One could take the corner at 50 mph and have no problems making the turn. The other could be poking along at only 35 mph and slide off the road, under the same conditions. The cops will ALWAYS put down they were going to fast, without any consideration for the true cause of the accident. The speed limit could be 45 and the guy going 35 would still be accused of speeding. I know, I've seen it happen a billion times. Falsified or Incomplete Reports are used in the statistic calculations.

The same applies to back when they measured the length of a skid to determine how fast you were driving.
It is impossible to determine how fast a car was moving by measuring the length of a skid, without knowing the durometer rating of the tire, the tread width on the surface, the weight of the car, and the porosity and texture of the pavement the skid was measured on.
Again, two identical cars with the only difference being the tires, on the same street, in the same worn path. A car with soft rubber tires traveling sixty mph, can stop that car in less distance than a car traveling only forty mph with hard rubber tires. This is a proven fact! But many cases were determined by the Falsified speed report based on impossible inaccurate measurement conditions.

Unless you know the source of the documents used for statistics and their accuracy, the report is meaningless.

TTUL
Gary

User avatar
Ice.Maiden
Guardian Angel
Guardian Angel
Posts: 70045
Joined: 14 Aug 2009, 23:31
Location: Peak District

Re: Human Obsolescence

Post by Ice.Maiden »

Hello Gary.

Glad to hear that Ruth was let off over the driving incident! : )

You're correct about types of tyres. I haven't a clue what's on mine, but I know they were expensive. Decent tyres are worth the money in my opinion, but it depends on the make of car as to what's best to use. So long as you use the best you can afford, to help with durability and grip in wet conditions, I still think that speeding's a no-no.

I've often wondered if the roads in the US're constructed with different materials to ours? You see on films when a car backs out of somewhere, does a turn and screeches off with little control over the first few yards, and yet the vehicles don't appear to be moving at great speed. The tyres always screech, You'd mostly have to put your foot to the board to get that to happen here. Just wondered, because I've seen it time and again.

An accident at a low speed wouldn't be booked as driving AT speed over here, but a driver could get done for undue care and attention, or dangerous driving if he was weaving in and out between traffic, etc.

One of the things that annoys me, is if you hit traffic lights or a junction at the top of a hill. If a vehicle in front of you rolls back into you, YOU get done for being too close! You'd be amazed at how many drivers don't use their hand brakes, and even if they do, they often roll back a few feet when accelerating forward again.

Basically, you ARE driving a lethal weapon when you get behind the wheel. You need compound eyes like a fly sometimes, and i absolutely hate driving through our towns and cities. You either have to pull up every few yards when lights change, or you'll hit a bus lane, taxi rank or something which means changing lanes, sometimes quite suddenly. Add to that that folk don't indicate, cut you up or change their minds at the last minute and trundle straight ahead instead of turning ... nightmare.

User avatar
Yogi
Oracle Class Poster
Oracle Class Poster
Posts: 7013
Joined: 04 Aug 2007, 19:37
Location: Chicagoland
Contact:

Re: Traffic Laws [split]

Post by Yogi »

NOTE
This topic was extracted from a thread that went off topic too far but was good enough to keep in the discussion forums. Please feel free to continue Traffic Laws discussions here.

User avatar
Kellemora
Brainiac Class Poster
Brainiac Class Poster
Posts: 3389
Joined: 07 Jul 2012, 18:52
Location: From St. Louis, current Knoxville, TN
Contact:

Re: Traffic Laws [split]

Post by Kellemora »

Hi Icey

Although we have idiots everywhere, the difference in driving back home and down south here is like night n day.
Back home, most every driving law was strictly enforced, they had to because of the number of cars.
Down here, only those laws that produce the top ranking revenues are enforced, and most of the rest totally ignored.
Neither place enforces Right-Of-Way laws, which is sad, because it is the Number ONE reason for deadly accidents.

Tires squealing on Movies and TV shows are added sound effects. We notice it on TV also, but it's not like that in real life. A car in a parking lot making a tight turn might leave a faint black mark due to the way a cars suspension and alignment is set up, but rarely does a tire squeal just from making a slow turn.

What worries me the most about driving down south here is the HIGH number of people who drive on the wrong side of the road. The cops ignore them, because they do also, and worse.

I know I mentioned this several times, but, back home we had a three strikes rule. Any cop reported by three different people, for the same illegal act, either provable or they admit to being caught, got the boot from the police force. So, for the most part, our cops back home did abide by the driving laws, unless they were on an emergency call and had their lights flashing. Even when they were going in silent mode, they still followed the driving laws.
After moving south, you would not believe the culture shock I experienced, when it came to law enforcement, or the lack thereof.
I often wondered where the habitual offenders of the law fired from our police force went to get a job after being blacklisted in our state.
Well, I found them!
The worst driving laws lawbreakers came to Knoxville and the city pinned a badge on them and gave them a car.
I'm not kidding either!
My wife and I followed one who almost hit us a couple of times in the past, with her video camera. In less than five miles, NOT on a call of any kind, just routine patrol. He broke the driving laws over 25 times, the same laws he would ticket someone else for IF he was doing his job properly.
That same day we also followed two other cops about three miles each, breaking at least six driving laws, and a school bus for only two miles who broke the law five times in that short distance.
We sent the film to the chief of police. Nothing ever came of it, other than we saw a different school bus driver on the route we had filmed.
If this was back home, those crooked cops would be looking for another job!

TTUL
Gary

User avatar
Ice.Maiden
Guardian Angel
Guardian Angel
Posts: 70045
Joined: 14 Aug 2009, 23:31
Location: Peak District

Re: Traffic Laws [split]

Post by Ice.Maiden »

Yes, I believe you about some of your police officers. When you first started telling me stories about how they bend the law to suit themselves, I found it difficult to take in. There're bad apples everywhere, but it's not too often that the police in the UK behave like that (although a few've come to light recently!).

No police officer'd drive on the wrong side of the road though, unless they were travelling down the centre of a narrow lane and had no choice but to be on both sides, or were intending to stop/ block someone in for engaging in some criminal activity. I don't dispute that it happens over there though, and think it's appalling that something can't be done about it.

Our police cars (plus ambulances and fire engines) aren't strictly allowed to go through red traffic lights, but it's accepted that if their sirens're on, there's (mostly) an emergency, so traffic'll give way to them and let them pass. I'm sure that a few police officers've maybe turned the flashing lights on when they've been in a hurry to finish their shift and get home, but generally speaking, they drive correctly and safely.

User avatar
Kellemora
Brainiac Class Poster
Brainiac Class Poster
Posts: 3389
Joined: 07 Jul 2012, 18:52
Location: From St. Louis, current Knoxville, TN
Contact:

Re: Traffic Laws [split]

Post by Kellemora »

Considering our police back home were normally on the up and up.
We figured all the comedy shows on TV about southerners was greatly exaggerated.
I expected there to be some small truths they were making fun of on TV.

After I moved south, I found little exaggeration, it really is the way it's depicted on TV.
I thought our governments back home were corrupted and getting worse.
Down here, they are almost total corruption, no matter which angle you look at it from.

Even so, heavy corruption in government is almost expected these days.
But I never dreamed in a million years how it could spill over into law enforcement and to the people themselves, as much as it has down here.

It's about two miles from my house up to the closest grocery store.
In that short of a distance, you can find at least four cars who were driving on the wrong side of the road, often stopped talking to someone, so you have to go around them on the passenger side of their vehicle.
After six pm, you will find over half a dozen abandoned on the wrong side of the road with NO emergency reflectors to warn oncoming traffic. After dark, they are major road hazards.

Back home, any vehicle found without reflectors facing the oncoming traffic, abandoned on the wrong side of the road, or creating a road hazard, would be towed to the police impound yard, and classified as an unroadworthy vehicle. The police back home are actually giving the owner of the car a fair break by doing it this way, as it is the lesser of all the offenses the car could be cited for. After paying the impound fee, all they have to do is show the reflectors are a part of the back of the car. The first time it's towed in. The second time, they add a few more charges, and the third time they are hit with all the laws they broke, and often admit to the moving violation that put their car in the location it was retrieved from off the roadway. The see it properly! There is no way someone can park their car on the wrong side of the road without driving it to where it was found parked. So most will just accept the tickets without adding to the situation and getting a confessed moving violation.

That is just one of the issue we find going on unchecked down south here.
Chapter 17, Article VI, Ordinance 17-296, Authorized Traffic Movement.
Is one of the laws neither the people nor the police abide by, and worse, the police do not issue tickets for violation of this ordinance. If they get enough complaints, they may issue a warning, but even this is rare.
Back home, as I said, the car would be impounded without warning or notification to the owner. There's no stopping the impound truck when it arrives either. You broke the law and now you have to suffer the consequences. Plain and simple!

TTUL
Gary

User avatar
pilvikki
Royal Poobah Penguin
Royal Poobah Penguin
Posts: 40729
Joined: 07 Aug 2007, 23:32
Location: france

Re: Traffic Laws [split]

Post by pilvikki »


here... it's unreal. they park wherever. literally. yesterday we were at the plaza and just leaving when a guy pulls up to the store DOORS, parking on the sidewalk, rather than use the practically empty parking lot!

they park right up to your bumper and you're expected to push/pull your way out of there, so never leave your car in gear. they park facing traffic, with traffic or, when everything else fails, backed between 2 cars, facing the road.

[ img ]


here you also need to watch your friendly tourists who'd forgotten which country they're driving in...

User avatar
Ice.Maiden
Guardian Angel
Guardian Angel
Posts: 70045
Joined: 14 Aug 2009, 23:31
Location: Peak District

Re: Traffic Laws [split]

Post by Ice.Maiden »

LOL!!!!!

User avatar
Kellemora
Brainiac Class Poster
Brainiac Class Poster
Posts: 3389
Joined: 07 Jul 2012, 18:52
Location: From St. Louis, current Knoxville, TN
Contact:

Re: Traffic Laws [split]

Post by Kellemora »

Boy, I think they would get a ticket, even down south here for pulling something like that.

I've always been curious about something.
Why do you guys have such LONG license plate numbers?
Certainly you guys don't have over 4 billion cars!

I looked it up, at the highest ever peak, you only had 35 million total vehicles.
The entirety of the USA counting all motor vehicles is 235 million.

Because our license plates are issued by each state, we don't need over 6 characters.
Assuming we used a national license plate I'm pretty sure it could be done using only 6 character spaces.
Just checked, using 6 character spaces at base 36, the number of different license plates is:
2,176,782,336
To avoid confusion, although we currently use O and I on our license plates. Lets remove a few more, like L, Q, U, and V, just to see what we get.
729,000,000
Wow, even I didn't realize this. A 6 character space license plate using only base 30 has 729 million individual strings. Amazing.
What if we only had 5 character spaces on our license plates? 24,300,000
Wouldn't handle the whole country, but we have no single state with over 24 million cars, well maybe California. They have 20 million cars and around 12 million trucks, add to that motorcycles and buses. California would need a six character license plate, but nowhere else.

Sorry, I got carried away here... It's just that I've always wondered WHY you guys used so many character spaces on your license plates. There aren't that many cars in the whole wide world to need eight character spaces.

TTUL
Gary

User avatar
Ice.Maiden
Guardian Angel
Guardian Angel
Posts: 70045
Joined: 14 Aug 2009, 23:31
Location: Peak District

Re: Traffic Laws [split]

Post by Ice.Maiden »

Well we don't have 8 in the UK Gary. The maximum letters and numbers're 7. Old-style ones had less, and then there're personalised plates which have less than, but don't exceed 7. Foreign rag. plates might display more, but cars have to be registered and taxed after so many months, whereupon, if a foreign car's driven on our roads, I believe it's given a new number.

User avatar
pilvikki
Royal Poobah Penguin
Royal Poobah Penguin
Posts: 40729
Joined: 07 Aug 2007, 23:32
Location: france

Re: Traffic Laws [split]

Post by pilvikki »


I find it odd that a country can have several plate formats. mine, f ex is BG 741 GM (I think?) and a smaller plate with the area code 11 next to it. but I've seen old ones like 905 11. 11 being the area code.

in the picture, the 75 is added to show the car is from paris.

User avatar
Ice.Maiden
Guardian Angel
Guardian Angel
Posts: 70045
Joined: 14 Aug 2009, 23:31
Location: Peak District

Re: Traffic Laws [split]

Post by Ice.Maiden »

Thanks for that info. I've only ever noticed letters denoting foreign cars, like Canada - CA - and the common EU format of having a blue section on the extreme left with EU.

User avatar
Kellemora
Brainiac Class Poster
Brainiac Class Poster
Posts: 3389
Joined: 07 Jul 2012, 18:52
Location: From St. Louis, current Knoxville, TN
Contact:

Re: Traffic Laws [split]

Post by Kellemora »

I thought it may have been more sinister.

Our drivers license's back home, before the illegal meltdown and changeover to a new system, carried one heck of a lot of information. The first four letters of your surname in code, you date of birth in code, etc.

I used to amaze people by telling them the first four and last four digits of their drivers license number. It also denoted their gender. Most folks did not know their drivers license was a calculated number. In many cases, neither did the counterfeiters, so they always messed up, hoping no one would notice.
Tavern owners who had large groups of kids always trying to get in their doors were taught a few of the tell-tale signs of a counterfeit license, but not how to do the calculations to determine the exact number.

Since we no longer use the old system, it won't hurt for me to tell you how the last three digits on the license were determined.
Most folks don't mind telling you the month and day they were born in, as long as you don't ask the year, which is why I only gave the last three digits.

It was fairly simple. Take the month times 63, save this number.
Take the day and double it, save this number.
Now take the two saved numbers and add them together, for a male.
If it is a female, add one to the number for a male.

As you may have guessed, it is easy to see a fake license if the birth month and license number don't match a range. E.g. January 065-125 - February 128-183 - March 191-251 - April 254-312, etc.
So, if you were a female born on September 12, the last three digits of your drivers license would be 592.
But bartenders were taught only the range for September as 569-628, more importantly, they were taught the year code, but the number they looked for changed each year, hi hi...

Told ya, I'm a walking encyclopedia of useless information!

User avatar
Ice.Maiden
Guardian Angel
Guardian Angel
Posts: 70045
Joined: 14 Aug 2009, 23:31
Location: Peak District

Re: Traffic Laws [split]

Post by Ice.Maiden »

No you're not - that's interesting! Ours don't run like that at all though. Names and addresses're there on licences, and accepted as ID, especially as most now have photos attached to them.

I don't see the point of having coded information on these things, because as soon as someone tells someone, who tells someone else - everyone knows, and so the people who make counterfeit licences know what to look for as well. : )
Last edited by Ice.Maiden on 12 Sep 2014, 16:37, edited 1 time in total.

User avatar
pilvikki
Royal Poobah Penguin
Royal Poobah Penguin
Posts: 40729
Joined: 07 Aug 2007, 23:32
Location: france

Re: Traffic Laws [split]

Post by pilvikki »


Canadian licences have your birthday displayed pretty simply, anyone can decipher them.

pictures of your grandkids seem to work in most bars as well. :lmao4:

User avatar
Ice.Maiden
Guardian Angel
Guardian Angel
Posts: 70045
Joined: 14 Aug 2009, 23:31
Location: Peak District

Re: Traffic Laws [split]

Post by Ice.Maiden »

Yes, same here.

*Pictures of your grandkids .... LOL!!!! That wouldn't work here, but if I suddenly found pics of a baby in our eldest's pocket, I'd start worrying! : )

Locked