street wisdom.

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street wisdom.

Postby pilvikki » 21 Sep 2014, 14:37


I has a problem. we live on a street that goes in a circle around a couple of storage buildings. en francesy it's called a Rond, but what is it in anglesy?

trying for one of your trusty translators isn't doing any good.

here's the google map page on it. the street names are all wrong, except for rue de la mairie, but that's besides the point.

our house, in the middle of the...?

if you look at the middle, there is a street that looks like an old key. that's the one i'm asking about. and that, incidentally, is called Grand Rond, not the street below it...

now, I suppose it would be called a Circle, but if I say Beatrice lives on the other side of the circle, that'll make no sense.

:shrug:

suggestions?
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Re: street wisdom.

Postby Ice.Maiden » 21 Sep 2014, 15:12

It'd be called a circle over here, or a circus/crescent, which's a road which leads into a semi-circle at the bottom, so that vehicles can drive round to the exit again.
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Re: street wisdom.

Postby Kellemora » 22 Sep 2014, 09:37

Same here Pil - It's called a Circle.

Back in my home state and county, the suffix of a street name was an important feature in naming streets.
Although in later years there were a few deviations due to subdivision names getting overly fancy.

Here are some examples:
Wildforest Circle, meant the road formed a loop, it could have one or two entrances.
Wildforest Trail, meant the road was a no thru street, but did have a cul-de-sac at the end.
Wildforest Path, meant the road was a no thru street, with no cul-de-sac as a turn-around at the end.
Wildforest Walkway, meant it was not open to motorized vehicles, basically a street sized sidewalk.
Wildforest Parkway, meant the street ran from one secondary road to another secondary road.

Then of course we had the usual terms, Alley, Lane, Drive, Street, Avenue, Road and Toll Road.
The words Highway and Turnpike was reserved for state use.
Some streets were named before the naming conventions were standardized, so it was possible to have a road with the suffix Road, when it was not a Road, but a dead end. Like Brook's Ferry Road ends at the river. No Ferry. Or Meyer's Mill Road, another dead end road which at one time ended at Meyer's Mill.

Down south here they do have other unusual names which have considerably different meanings than they did back home.
Several streets in my immediate vicinity end with the suffix Pike.
To get to my house you would drive down Chapman Highway to Young High Pike, follow it to Martin Mill Road, then turn on Avenue A to Cleage Street. While driving down Cleage Street all the roads off either side are named Drive, whether they are a dead end or a thru street.

Young High Pike is not really large enough or long enough to be considered a Road back home. Nor is it wide enough to be considered an Avenue. Although, considering it's age, the use of the word Road would be acceptable. Where the heck they came up calling it a Pike is beyond any and all comprehension.
Avenue A is not a true Avenue, and probably should have been named a Street or Lane.

Shortly after I moved down south, curious as to what the term PIKE meant when used as a suffix for a road, I looked it up.
Historically, it meant the road was a Toll Road.
None of the streets here ending in Pike are Toll Roads and most never have been toll roads, so I dug further.
Pike was also used to designate a Major Road. Each end of a Pike was joined to another Major roadway.
Young High Pike only crossed one major roadway, Chapman Highway, and at the time it was built, did not connect to any Major roadway at either end.
So I kept digging to find out the naming conventions used in the south. Mainly the Appalachian area.
Turns out it was quite haphazard. As the roads connecting small scattered communities were taken over by the state, they all were given a highway number. For convenience existing names were often used with the suffix Highway, after it left a larger community. In our case, after you drive down Henley Street leaving the city, the road changes to Chapman Highway.
As it passes through some communities, who may have used Main Street as the original name, they may have adopted the name of the highway or continued to use the original name.
Back to the suffix name Pike.
At the time a highway was installed or taken over for maintenance by the state, any street or road which connected to another street or road, or led to a state numbered highway, or crossed a state numbered highway, and if such road was maintained by the county, in lieu of the community, it was given the suffix Pike.
Over the years as new larger roads were construction, these original roads named Pike, which at one time were considered major roads, were dwarfed by the large more modern roads, but the names stayed in place.
This is how a little side road leading to a subdivision, like Young High Pike, is still called Pike.

Here is the Wikipedia listing for the various names used on streets.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Street_suffix

TTUL
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Re: street wisdom.

Postby Ice.Maiden » 22 Sep 2014, 11:01

Interesting. Over here, Pike means the same thing - there used to be a turnpike, or toll road, which came into existence in the mid 17th century.
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Re: street wisdom.

Postby pilvikki » 22 Sep 2014, 11:37


in Canada pike is dinner.

[ img ]

I used to serve mine stuffed.

:grin:

so i'm stuck with the circle then.... sod, it just doesn't sound right.

but thanks! :dance:
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Re: street wisdom.

Postby Ice.Maiden » 22 Sep 2014, 11:44

Now doesn't that food look lovely - but I once (only once) cooked a pike that went drastically wrong. The entire house was filled with the most disgusting, putrid smell, and yet this was a freshly-caught fish.

I'd washed it, and wrapped it in foil, then slowly baked it. OMG!!! It stench was so hideous that I was almost sick. Maybe the fact that I hadn't gutted it had something to do with it .....
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Re: street wisdom.

Postby pilvikki » 23 Sep 2014, 17:58


:yikes: :thud:

oh, it's too bad you didn't see my reaction!

:lmao3:
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Re: street wisdom.

Postby Ice.Maiden » 24 Sep 2014, 13:46

:lol:

LOL, I swear that's true. The head was still on it as well. I had no idea how to prepare and cook the thing, and THOUGHT there was something amiss when this vile dirty river water smell started to escape from the oven. It got slowly worse as the thing cooked, and then it took about 5 days to get the stink out of the house!! :lol:
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Re: street wisdom.

Postby pilvikki » 24 Sep 2014, 16:01


mother once hired a country girl, supposedly grown up on a farm and asked the girl to prepare a nice, plump whitefish for dinner.

so the girl cut it into 5 pieces: scales, innards and all.

mother was not pleased.

:lmao4:
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Re: street wisdom.

Postby Ice.Maiden » 24 Sep 2014, 18:46

:lmao4:

I'm supposed to understand the basics of cooking, but I was young and just married. I don't think I'd ever seen a pike before, let alone try and cook one!
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Re: street wisdom.

Postby pilvikki » 25 Sep 2014, 07:07


I can understand your confusion, but that's one problem I never had: I was the designated fish cleaner since the age of 10 or so.

never ran into any of these though:

[ img ]

:shock:
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Re: street wisdom.

Postby Ice.Maiden » 25 Sep 2014, 08:16

:shock: Bet that'd take some cutting up and preparation!

These days, I can fillet a fish (not like that one though!! :lol: ) and do the deed, but I really had no idea about that pike. Plus, some fish're served with the heads on them, so ... on it stayed. I'll never forget the terrible smell though. Hideous.
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