Soya

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Soya

Postby Ice.Maiden » 21 Feb 2014, 19:45

According to The Ecologist, soya, which's added to many regularly-eaten products is a real no-no, especially with a high percentage of it coming from GM crops.

What’s wrong with soya?

Allergens Soya allergies are on the rise as soya consumption goes up. These days, allergies to soya proteins – the symptoms of which include rashes, diarrhoea, vomiting, stomach cramps and breathing difficulties – are almost as common as those to milk.
Phytates These substances can block the uptake of essential minerals – such as calcium, magnesium, iron and especially zinc – in the intestinal tract. All beans contain phytic acid, but soybeans have higher levels than any other. Oriental children who do not consume fish or meat products to counterbalance the effect of their high-phytate, soya- and rice-based diets have been shown to suffer nutritional deficiency illnesses, stunting, rickets and other developmental problems.
Enzyme inhibitors Soya contains potent enzyme inhibitors, which block the action of trypsin and other enzymes needed for protein digestion. Normal cooking does not deactivate these substances, which can also cause serious gastric distress and reduced protein digestion, and can lead to chronic deficiencies in the uptake of essential amino acids such as methionine and leucine, as well as isoleucine and valine. These are all needed to combat stress, avoid depression, synthesise new body protein and maintain a healthy immune system.
Hemagglutinin Soya products also contain another chemical, hemagglutinin, which promotes clumping of red blood cells. These clumped red cells are unable fully to take up oxygen and carry it, via the bloodstream, to the body’s tissues and organs. Hemagglutinin has also been observed to act as a growth depressant. Although the process of fermenting soybeans does deactivate hemagglutinin, cooking and precipitation do not.
Phytoestrogens Soya contains high levels of oestrogen mimics known as isoflavones, which can disrupt hormone function in both men and women. High levels of circulating oestrogens are a risk for certain types of oestrogen-dependent cancers, for instance of the breast, ovaries and testicles. Animal studies have linked high consumption of isoflavones with infertility and reduce immunity.
Antithyroid agents The plant oestrogens in soya can also cause an underactive thyroid and are implicated in thyroid cancer. In infants, consumption of soya formula has been linked to autoimmune thyroid disease.
Aluminium To manufacture soya protein isolate – the high-protein derivative of soya that is used in snacks, infant formulas, protein bars, breakfast cereals, baked goods, ice creams and yoghurts – soybeans are first mixed with an alkaline solution to remove fibre, then precipitated and separated using an acid wash and, finally, neutralised in an alkaline solution. Acid washing in aluminium tanks leaches high levels of aluminium into the final product. As a result, soya-based formula can contain around 1,000 per cent more aluminium than is found in conventional milk-based formulas.

YUCK.
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Re: Soya

Postby pilvikki » 27 Feb 2014, 06:21


:thud:
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Re: Soya

Postby Ice.Maiden » 27 Feb 2014, 12:50

They put this in baby formulas ... makes you wonder what WORSE cr*p's in all the adult stuff.
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