Rainforest

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Rainforest

Postby G5Pontiac » 05 Apr 2008, 19:38

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Alsea Bay, near my home.

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My house with dual sport bike

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Pelicans

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Creek in the rainforest near here

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Beaver Creek tide lands near here

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Cape Ridge, 1500 or more feet above Yachats river valley, about 6 miles from here, becomes Cape Perpetua, named by Captain Cook.

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My back yard with my G5 pointing toward my spruce forest beyond fence.

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About 7 miles south of here the white sandy beach ends for awhile, and the rocky beach starts.

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Looking into my spruce forest, you can see whats left of an ancient cedar tree that came down. It had stood upright when I moved here 32 years ago, but it fell a couple of years back. That cedar snag had stood upright for probably 150 years or so. About 150 years ago, or more, a large forest fire swept this area and burned down a forest of giant cedar trees. The fire burned for miles, but there were no people around, not even Indians, and no roads. It was a natural event, unless some Indians did it. I doubt that because they didn't live near here.

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I told you that I'm older than dirt, 73. A friend and I took our little bikes to the top of Table Mountain, near here. It's very primitive, but there is an outcropping of Nepheline Synite, a granite type rock. People go up there and get that rock for ornamental purposes. (I don't think I spelled it right)

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During the winter, the beach near my house churns up all kinds of foam, as you can see here. This beach is nearly deserted, even in the summer, and I usually have all 8 miles of white sandy beach to myself.

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About 4 or 5 miles inland, one starts to see large trees. That's not me in the picture, that's a friend of my son's.
Last edited by G5Pontiac on 06 Apr 2008, 11:02, edited 2 times in total.
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Re: Rainforest

Postby StVandal » 05 Apr 2008, 21:35

The Oregon coast is one of the most beautiful places in the United States.. Thanks for sharing!
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Re: Rainforest

Postby pilvikki » 06 Apr 2008, 02:31

spectacular! :love:

i looked up your rocks:

Nepheline syenite is a white to light grey medium-grained IGNEOUS ROCK. It consists mostly of soda feldspar, nepheline and potash feldspar, accessory magnesium and iron-rich minerals. The Canadian nepheline syenite industry began in 1932 when claims were staked on Blue Mountain near Peterborough, Ontario, where it is still produced. Persistent and lengthy efforts in technical and market research and development were necessary to establish this industry. Canada was the first country to develop the use of nepheline syenite as a raw material for glass, ceramic and filler industries and was the world's only producer for many years.

Over the years, nepheline syenite has become preferred to feldspar as a source of alumina and alkalis for glass manufacture. It promotes more rapid melting at lower temperatures, thus reducing energy consumption, lengthening the life of the furnace and improving the yield and quality of glass. The material is used in ceramic glazes and enamels and in fillers in paints, papers, plastics and foam rubber. In Canada, about two-thirds of nepheline syenite is consumed by the glass industry for containers, flat glass, insulating fibreglass and textile glass fibre.


now, why do you use such wee tiny bikes?
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Re: Rainforest

Postby mamie » 06 Apr 2008, 06:59

Such lovely pictures! Your little world is indeed gorgeous!
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Re: Rainforest

Postby Linda » 06 Apr 2008, 11:21

You DO live in paradise. I have always dreamed of living in a place like that!! Hopefully it will always be kept that way.
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Re: Rainforest

Postby G5Pontiac » 06 Apr 2008, 12:10

I like the little bikes as a hobby, and currently I have 6 little bikes of one kind or another, and the mid-size Dual Sport bike that you see with the 2 cases of oil on the back. The bottom line is that the little bikes are fun.

They have their practical aspects, too. Getting about 150 miles per gallon on the road, they will go just about anywhere safely. If I go up a steep narrow trail above the ocean, or on a mountain, and there is not much room to turn around, I can easily stop and turn the little bike around. The little bikes will run 35 or 40 miles per hour, which is more than fast enough for trails and Forestry Service roads. Usually on bad roads I'll seldom ride more than about 25 mph. The handle bars fold on the little Honda CT-70 in the picture, so it takes up very little storage space, yet it is quite comfortable on trails. Not bad for a bike that's close to 40 years old. If I have a long ways to go, I load the little bikes in my pickup truck and haul them to where I intend to ride. For instance, I may park in a Forestry Service campground, unload the bikes, and head out from there to the top of a mountain, or up a river or stream. After riding a little stomach pump like that for several hours it's nice to eat lunch in a park, drink a beer, and head home in comfort. :grin:

The Dual Sport bike, a Yamaha XT225, is great for trails or on the highway, and will carry two people at up to about 80 miles per hour. It's practical because there are no freeways around here, and the roads are twisty and narrow. The main highway, U.S. 101, has a 55 mph speed limit; but you can't do that in many places, especially when you must slow to about 25 mph on some turns with an automobile. That bike will go against strong winds at 65 mph and still average 77 miles per gallon of gasoline. With the speed and power it has on the highway, I ride it rather than haul it on the pickup truck; that is unless I'm headed south to Arizona for the winter, then I take it with me.

My life is not perfect, and I have my share of heartbreak and misery, but at least my surroundings are nice for me; others that live in the city would probably grow to hate it here after the novelty wore off. I live my dream.
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Re: Rainforest

Postby G5Pontiac » 06 Apr 2008, 12:35

It was a natural event, unless some Indians did it. I doubt that because they didn't live near here.


When I spoke about the forest fire I mentioned the Indians. It didn't read well. The Indians were good stewards of the forest. At the right time, they would set fire to underbrush, and that would actually help prevent forest fires. The underbrush when struck by lightening would act like kindling and set the woods on fire. The Indians managed that underbrush with controlled fires, and of course there is always a possibility that the fire could get out of hand. That's what I should have said. I love indians, and the Pacific Northwest Indians were some of the most intelligent and advanced Native Americans around. Traits are inherited, and Native Americans do not have much of the filthy and disgusting "guile" that characterizes many white people, and exemplifies many in the Mideast countries.
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Re: Rainforest

Postby pilvikki » 06 Apr 2008, 20:27

i was scratching my head about the indian comment and am glad that you sorted that out. :P

the cape ridge is totally unbelievable.

i see your point about the wee bikes being handy in tight spots.
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Re: Rainforest

Postby imbizze » 07 Apr 2008, 07:29

I love the photos! I don't think that I have ever seen such tall trees! I love all of the untamed nature in your neck of the woods. You are lucky to live where you do.
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Re: Rainforest

Postby VS~ » 13 May 2008, 13:03

The Oregon coast has been one of my favorite places since my sister and I travelled out there in June 2002. I have stood on that very spot that you referenced, Cape Perpetua. I remember that because of it having been named by Captain Cook, who I grew up believing I was related to, only to discover in my adulthood, that Captain Cook had no offspring and consequently no descendants. I do, however, come from the same line of Cooks as the famous captain.
You don't look older than dirt, Stan. I'm sure living in the Pacific Northwest has kept you young to a certain extent. You would have to be a strong person to live in that kind of remoteness and I know the winters must be very harsh. Heck, it was cold in June when we were there!!
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