Windows 95 Tips, Tricks, and Tweaks

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Windows 95 Tips, Tricks, and Tweaks

Postby Yogi » 18 Oct 2014, 08:02

Tumblr wrote:When you abandoned Windows95 so many long years ago to the harsh elements of the basement or your nana’s house, something within it twisted. It was once your trusted companion, always offering helpful advice on how to better utilize its dazzling features, but now it wants something back: your soul


IT'S BAAAACK: http://windows95tips.com/
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Re: Windows 95 Tips, Tricks, and Tweaks

Postby Kellemora » 18 Oct 2014, 11:32

Hilarious Yogi...

Before the lightning took out my main computer, I had VB with Win95 and Win98 in it. Not that I ever used them. Just the novelty of having them boot up and remembering the old days, only a thousand times faster, hi hi...

I'm running Ubuntu again today, and have lost even more time trying to do things Ubuntu doesn't think we are smart enough to do. In a previous post I tried using a unicode character. I've always been able to from Debian and Mint. Can't get it to show up using Ubuntu, but I'll wait and see if I can later using Debian, just in case phpBB turned off the ability to use Unicode Characters, which I don't think they would do.

Also, Ubuntu has no Root Terminal. I've tried sudo and gksu to open nautilus and it pitches error messages. Even when you do get into nautilus, you cannot get to the root directory to install folders or executables. Some programmers have found work arounds but they are way above my head. All that coding to do something that should be standard in a Distro. Even had to install GKSU to get to the root terminal the long hard way. But Ubuntu still pitches errors about missing a directory. I tried mkdir to create it, as the instructions say, but you have to be root to do so. It doesn't work as root either.
I'm adding this to my list, now 1002 reasons not us use Ubuntu.
OK, I'm still using it, trying to give it a fair chance. But man o man is it aggravating to do anything with it.
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Re: Windows 95 Tips, Tricks, and Tweaks

Postby Yogi » 19 Oct 2014, 09:46

Not having a root terminal is a security feature of Ubuntu, not a shortcoming - so they claim. It's not easy to get around that problem while inside the Linux OS. However, I am certain you can do things from the Linux shell much in the same way as you can manipulate Windows (in the old days) via dropping down to the DOS level. In Linux the equivalent is to use the shell: ctrl+alt+F1 gets you down to that level. In the shell you are relegated to command line instructions only. Typing in help will give you a list of commands.

I had reason to look up what the default character coding is for Ubuntu, and THAT was a job and a half. Nobody talks about anything that basic. But, I think it is UTF-8 and I also think it can be changed. I don't know how to do it, but if you find the information on what is the default, I'm sure that same web page will tell you how to change it to what you need.

Have you tried sudo mkdir instead of plain mkdir? adding sudo ahead of the command will give you root permissions in Ubuntu, or at least it does in every case that I've run into. You are doing strange things over there and might require bigger guns. I'm reasonably sure this same format works for launching programs too. sudo synaptic from a terminal, for example, will launch synaptic package manager with root permissions.

Also, it's my understanding that Ubuntu 14.10 (and a stand alone MATE) will be released on Monday, 20 October. Maybe the new distribution will get you closer to what you need.
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Re: Windows 95 Tips, Tricks, and Tweaks

Postby Kellemora » 19 Oct 2014, 11:05

Hi Yogi
Yes, I am familiar with and use Sudo, Sudo Su, GKSU, etc.
I can get into a Root Terminal from Terminal easily enough. What I can't seem to figure out what to do is get to the Root Directory in Ubuntu from Terminal.
Ubuntu has disabled several features of common programs, like Nautilus.
I even tried installing the Debian version of Nautilus and was faced with the same problem. Also tried installing Caja like used on Mint.

Ubuntu is built on Debian, and it appears Mint is built on Ubuntu, because many of the things Ubuntu has locked out, Mint has unlocked again, but only if you use a different program.
Like Ubuntu has Root locked out of Nautilus, so it is on Mint, but if you use Caja, you can get to the Root Directory, if you are in Root, and do the things needing done as the Root user.

As you know, I've been using Debian for some time now, after Ubuntu turned tail on us four years ago. I never could get Mint to work until recently. So I decided to give them all a fair shot again.

It appears Ubuntu's goal is to become a proprietary OS similar to Windows, and perhaps gain some Windows users by making a system Windows users cannot mess up.

In order to use Ubuntu for my daily work, I must install our company fonts for one. I also have own fonts I use. I tried every way I could find, including the directions given by Ubuntu to install fonts. After three more hours wasted, I jumped over to Mint and did it all in under 5 minutes. In Debian I could do it in under 2 minutes. But then I'm used to Debian.

I have a couple of executables I need to run for work also. I can run them from the desktop, but they do not have access to things in Root, even if I change permissions. Ubuntu just won't let you go backwards at all. If you are running a program as User, it has no access to Administration or Root to read necessary files. This is why the program itself needs to be installed in Root, then RUN in User mode as a User.

As of 10 pm last night, I decided to quit wasting any more time with Ubuntu. I went to the store they want you to use instead of Synaptic and found most of the featured programs were all being sold for a price. They still have the free ones, but getting to them, shee... I just went to Synaptic or used command line apt-get to get what I needed.

I'm using Mint on my newest computer, but as you can see, I'm here on Debian 7 again. Although I have Ubuntu loaded on all of my computers, this is the one I was using Ubuntu on, but rebooted back into Debian to get some serious work done. Not exactly happy with Debian 7 over Debian 6 much either, which is why I started looking around again. But Debian still outshines the lot of them.
I don't think I want to start looking at other platforms like BSD or RedHat again. But if Debian keeps messing around, I may have to. Almost all of the companies that use Linux seem to use RedHat for the support features RedHat charges them for. I did use CentOS for awhile, which is supposed to be a clone of RedHat, tried Fedora the light weight RedHat and couldn't get it to do much, so went back to CentOS until I got it figured out.

It really is a shame the direction Ubuntu is headed. Their version 8.04 is what brought me back to Linux, and it has been downhill with them ever since.
I have tried their other versions, as suggested by others, Lubuntu, Xubuntu, etc. Even tried Edubuntu server for a short time. I will say, each of those are better than Ubuntu, but I'm not familiar with the programs or methods they use to do things.

As you said, each Distro does it's own thing, nothing is standard in Linux.
But by the same token, the same can be said about Windows versions also. It's just that there is only ONE of each Windows version, but there are hundreds of each Linux version, and in all flavors.

When Debian does what I want it to, and Ubuntu makes work and headaches from everything that should be simple. I see no reason to mess around with their changes, taking away our freedoms.

TTUL
Gary
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Re: Windows 95 Tips, Tricks, and Tweaks

Postby Yogi » 20 Oct 2014, 10:50

I don't mean to sound malicious, but Ubuntu has locked out the root account to protect the system from people like you. It's the same reasoning Microsoft does not allow you to be a true root user as well. 95% of the casual computer users in this world would unwittingly destroy the OS if they had true root access. I'm sure you can appreciate that statement.

But what about the remaining 5% who might actually know what they are doing as root? I think you might find this article of some value, if you are still interested in Ubuntu: https://help.ubuntu.com/community/RootSudo

I've never found a statement from the Ubuntu development team that spells out what their plan for the future is in any detail. There are blogs around where you can get some insights into current development, however. From what I gather Ubuntu is giving up on Nautilus and that is why you find it in the state it is in. The new file manager will be home brewed. I saw a reference to its name once, but I don't recall what it is. It will be consistent with the desire to accommodate the mobile device crowd. There is no mobile specific Linux distro yet. I'm not going to argue Android or iOS here because the Ubuntu people have set their eyes on entering that field just as did Microsoft. All the serious Ubuntu development these days is geared to give mobile device users a choice of operating systems. There will be an Ubuntu smart phone and mobile device OS come some time in 2015.

Where does that leave us desktop users who fancy Ubuntu? Out on a lurch. If it's a desktop workstation you are trying to evaluate, you are looking at the wrong OS with Ubuntu. It can be adapted, MATE for example, but the base system is headed toward the Cloud where mobile rules. You don't want to be root if your head is in the Clouds. :mrgreen:
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Re: Windows 95 Tips, Tricks, and Tweaks

Postby Kellemora » 20 Oct 2014, 13:49

Hi Yogi

Interesting article as to WHY they locked users out, and the tons of reasons they did this.

But most of the reasons given have nothing to do with WHY we must have Root Access.
In my case, it is NOT to run programs, it is to place folders in the Root Directory where they belong.

Administrative mode is fine for some files user programs use. But when you install a program for ALL USERS of the machine, which is how most of your basic programs are installed, they only work if their associated files are placed in the Root Directory.

Sure, a user can install fonts in their home directory, and link them to the program they are running which resides in root and runs in user space. But then you add another user, or have different user names for yourself for different purposes, then you have to maintain a totally separate file to keep track of the changes made to each users fonts file. I was doing this when I first started using Linux and Windows also, because Windows was limited to the number of fonts you could have installed in the active folder.
So, I began keeping a Master Font File way back in the early windows days, updated fonts in the master file as new versions of the same font was released. A nice neat little package I kept current. I would install whatever fonts I used most to the Windows fonts file, and in some cases, uninstall fonts that belonged to a client.
I still maintain this Master Font File to this day. Right next to it is a Font Folder of the fonts I use most often, or permanently actually.
Each time I get a new computer, I copy it's existing font folder to a machine and OS specific folder, add the fonts from my Font folder to the computers font folder. Then when I quit using the machine, I take out my modified fonts folder and replace it with the machine and OS specific folder it came with.
Same thing when I used to work with clients fonts. I didn't take the chance I would forget which ones I installed, so after I finished their job, I always replaced the font folder with the original. Actually, the modified one containing the fonts I used.

I spent hours trying to figure out how to place my fonts folder in Ubuntu. Tried all the steps shown on the Ubuntu website, and steps others were using to gain access to the Root Directory.
I'm not a programmer, so should not have to use programming language to be able to do something as simple as replacing a fonts folder, so all programs have access to it. In other words, place it in Root where it belongs.

I'm also having a LAN issue with both Ubuntu and Linux Mint. Not my computer either, there are so many bug reports, all saying, enough users having this problem so moving it to active. Well, it's been in Active now since early 2012 and the problem has not been addressed yet.

I have NONE of the problems in Debian that I've been faced with in Ubuntu, and only a couple of problems with Linux Mint, which are true bugs they claim to be working on.

But I have a different mindset about things. IF Ubuntu and Mint are both built on Debian, and it works in Debian just fine, WHAT did Ubuntu or Mint MESS UP that it does not work right in their Distro.
To be fair, some things I could not get to work in Debian right away, installing Ubuntu or Mint got rid of the problem, BUT it let me see what and where the problem was. Most often it was Ubuntu or Mint had newer drivers than Debian's install disk did. Like the graphics card driver supplied with Debian was the wrong one for my card, and they did not have the right one to install in their list. I searched and searched on-line for the right drivers, all to no avail, because I really didn't know what to look for, every website gave different info. By installing both Ubuntu and Mint, then looking to see what they used, I finally pegged the right one. I installed it in Debian and it fixed that problem.

All of the suggested methods of finding out what card I had in my computer kept turning up AMD/ATI Dev. 1002:9998 and using VESA: DVST as the driver, which I knew it wasn't. The data I was being fed by the tests was not totally erroneous, it was just that the card is not listed that way. Once I stumbled across the fact the AMD/ATI 9998 was REALLY a Richland Radeon HD8370D graphics card, a simple driver I kept overlooking was all it took. xorg-video-ATI and everything worked perfect. This is in the used Dell, so the driver should have been in Debian's package. But I know they can't keep up with everything without sources of income like other Distro's enjoy.

I've always liked Nautilus, over the ones used for KDE or whatever, but have found Caja to work a little better.
Can't say I like Pluma over Gedit much. But it may not be the editor as much as the LAN bug in Mint. At least Mint is still keeping a desktop fork open, which Ubuntu seems to have totally ignored.

I checked out the Corning website about their Glass. Forget if you posted it or I found it elsewhere. Totally awesome what we have in store for the future. However, not once in the entire 11 minute long video did they show anyone actually able to enter data, using a notepad as the main computer.

Considering the amount of data that must be entered around the world each day, I doubt very much desktops will disappear in my lifetime. Just in case, I'm already using the netbook with a keyboard and mouse connected to it, hi hi...
But the toy portable computers just don't have the power or the speed of a desktop.

TTUL
Gary
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