Google Chrome's latest update NOT compatible with any

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Google Chrome's latest update NOT compatible with any

Postby Kellemora » 11 Sep 2014, 12:05

Google Chrome's latest update NOT compatible with any version of Flash Player.

Adobe has quit maintaining Adobe Flash.
So we rely on other 3rd party plugins to view Flash on-line.

Shockwave Flash, and Pepper Flash both came out with upgrades, but neither work with Google Chrome since Google's most recent upgrade.

Google has purposely made the Chrome Browser in such a way you cannot Roll-back to a previous version, without doing a complete install and losing all bookmarks and other settings. Nor will they support older versions.

Just a warning for other Linux users. DON'T upgrade to the new Google Chrome until they have a working Flash Player for it.

Mozilla Firefox and Iceweasel still work with Flash. Epiphany does not work well with Flash.
Opera's most recent upgrade has caused it to be a memory and CPU hog and runs slow as molasses in the dead of winter.

I've tried both old and new versions of libflashplayer.so and libpepflashplayer.so to no avail.
The new pointer in the latest Google Chrome is not accurate either, the left pointing finger tip is below the target it selects. I'll have to call this latest fiasco another Google DOWNGRADE!

TTUL
Gary
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Re: Google Chrome's latest update NOT compatible with any

Postby Yogi » 13 Sep 2014, 08:33

I know not of what you speak, but it is of the utmost interest to me. As you know my default operating system is Windows 7. Suffice it to say that I install all the updates for the OS and the apps on a timely basis. In other words, just a few days ago I updated the entire Adobe suit of software installed on my computer along with Java. Micorsoft just pushed down a couple dozen updates for the OS and IE 11. I couldn't be more up to date if I tried.

Actually, I am more up to date than most when it comes to Firefox in that I use their beta release called Nightly. On Thursday they released a new (for them) technology that changes the way browsers do things. Since it's beta it's not commonly available in the Mozilla world, but I understand Google, and all it's Chrome, use the equivalent of Mozilla's E10S multi-process technology. This multi-process approach runs the browser internals in a separate process from each web page that is open. Each page is run in a process of it's own. The idea is to confine web page handling to a sandbox environment to increase security, performance, and improve memory usage. It's specifically aimed at the likes of Flash Player that has been a security risk since day one. HTML5 was supposed to get around the need for Flash, but it's not being implemented as rapidly as the risks are increasing. Thus the browser developers of the world are looking at alternatives.

My Windows environment has IE, Firefox, Chrome, Maxthon, and Opera browsers installed. I checked each one out before making this post and they all run Flash apps flawlessly. This is amazing given that Mozilla warns us about some incompatibilities that might show up if we elect to use E10S. I have not tried to run any of my Linux systems for a few days, but I will get to them just to see if there are any new problems. I understand that you have a need for Google's Chrome, but I don't. All I use in Linux is Firefox and Maxthon. Oddly enough I have also tried Opera under Wine which seems to work as expected.

The downgrades you refer to are intended to improve security. I'm sure Google has better things to do than to figure out ways to thwart hackers. Unfortunately, hackers are very persistent and browsers are very vulnerable. I understand why Google will no longer support Flash in their browsers but YouTube is synonymous with Flash. I don't believe they are shooting themselves in the foot just to make a better browser. Besides, it's all working well in Windows. I'm not yet sure why. :think:
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Re: Google Chrome's latest update NOT compatible with any

Postby Kellemora » 13 Sep 2014, 13:23

Hi Yogi - Of course it works in Windows and MAC, Adobe supports them fully. Adobe has stopped supporting Linux several releases ago, which is why we use Shockwave Flash or Pepper Flash.

Flash works fine in Mozilla Firefox, and the Linux derivatives like IceWeasel.
But Google Chrome is a system all its own, and has always had problems with Adobe Flash. They usually get it sorted out in a couple of days and we get a new update to make things hum along as before.

Hard to believe, but some of the problems we are having in the Linux world has to do with an influx of new users. More users means more problems are discovered, which lowers the priority of many problems needing to be solved. Even though Linux is open source, it still takes Money to keep it humming. So problems emanating from their sources of income take top priority.
This is why the CUPS printing part of Debian7 has never been fixed, and why Flash is not yet fixed.
Although distributed freely, Google Chrome is NOT Chromium for one. It just runs on Chromium. Like Ubuntu or Mint run on Debian. Ubuntu is where the money is going, so they will get Flash working on an Ubuntu machine first, then Mint, and finally maybe Debian will be able to use the fix.

On a different topic. I pulled some hard drives from an old machine I was discarding, and found Ubuntu 8.04 and Debian 6 installed on the drive. I ran through my normal printing processes after booting a machine from that drive, and printing worked perfectly. Yet when I examined the CUPS file and Printer Driver, they were an exact match as the ones used in Debian 7, but printing does not work in Debian 7. I even tried copying the entire folders over to Debian 7, just in case something was different. Nope, still identical, still same problem.
So I'm now absolutely certain Debian 7 is the problem stopping printing.

I also learned a little about 184-pin DIMM memory boards in the process too. Can't use a PC2700 board in a machine that only uses PC3200 boards, hi hi... All of my new machines use DDR2 1066 memory boards. I did not test to see if I could use a DDR2 800 memory board or not. I read you are supposed to be able to, but the machines memory speed will slow down all of them to the slowest.

Oh, I do have one important question. On the SATA plugs on the Motherboards. Is one of them for the main drive? I know if I only have ONE hard drive, I can apparently plug into any of them. BUT, if I want to add a second hard drive, how do I tell the Motherboard which one is the boot drive, if they are both bootable?
I know, study the book, hi hi...

One other question. Some Mobo's only have TWO sata plugs on them, mine all have Four plugs. What do you do if you have only Two Sata plugs, and Four Sata devices? Do they make a Y patchcord or is that not allowed?

Thanks

TTUL
Gary
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Re: Google Chrome's latest update NOT compatible with any

Postby Yogi » 13 Sep 2014, 19:01

Gary wrote:Of course it works in Windows and MAC, Adobe supports them fully. Adobe has stopped supporting Linux several releases ago, which is why we use Shockwave Flash or Pepper Flash.

I think you got it backwards. Linux developers are falling short on their support for Adobe Flash products. I also hear from Apple Computer owners that Flash of any flavor does not work on their machines. It's interesting that you would be using Shockwave successfully because as far as I can tell, Adobe produces Shockwave: http://www.adobe.com/products/shockwaveplayer.html

Microsoft, Mozilla, and Google have been pushing to find alternatives to Flash players of any kind, but the developers keep developing apps and the users keep using them. I think the only way they will ble able to force a migration is to do what you claim Google is doing, i.e., simply don't allow it to be used in their browser.

My mother board has two SATA 3 ports and it would be lovely if I had four. I've used IDE flatwire cables that have multiple connectors on one run. While I haven't searched for them yet, I'd be surprised if you could not do the same with SATA. My system has three hard drives. Two are on the SATA bus and one remains IDE. The boot order is set in BIOS. One of the two SATA divers is my Ubuntu setup with GRUB. The other SATA drive is that SSD I just installed with a Windows MBR. I set the default for the Windows drive to boot first if there is no CD installed, but I can interrupt the process (press F11) and pick any of the four drives as the boot device.
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Re: Google Chrome's latest update NOT compatible with any

Postby Kellemora » 14 Sep 2014, 10:47

Hi Yogi
My poor questions don't matter much now.
I've lost yet two more computers.
Fortunately, the same RAM in the old one I was using fit's this one.
I'm working on an old Lan 10 card too.

I'm sorta miffed, because I popped open the case on the computer I was using to replace the CPU fan. Did not touch anything else, and did ground myself before replacing it.
Connected everything back up and it was working fine.
Since I had room to work, I shut-down and popped the cover.
Slipped in another hard drive on SATA port 3. Without getting anywhere near the Mobo, already had a loose SATA cable plugged to the board and the power cable handy since the machine was built.
When I went to power up, it ran for a second then died.
The fans run, but no monitor and no keyboard lights. No beeps either.
Ut Oh, I guess the 650 watt power supply couldn't handle running two hard drives.
In any case, I'm sure the PSU failed. I happen to have a spare sitting here, I thought.
Installed it and when I powered up, poof.
I had forgotten the -5 or -12 volts was out on that power supply, I should have thrown it away, because when the -5 or -12 goes, it fries the Mobo, which is why I had to buy a new Mobo when it did fry.
Kicking myself in the rear for not throwing it away.

I can look at the bright side. Even though I can't really afford it right now.
I talked to my computer guy and that 599 dollar computer he had, he already sold.
However, since I didn't need all that power anyhow, he can make one similar for a couple of trade-offs.
He has several commercial accounts who do things as cheaply as possible.
I have six 100 gig hard drives and two 250 gig hard drives just sitting here, all IDE, I have several smaller like 80s and 40 gigs he doesn't want. Plus eight 10/100 LAN cards WITH the Boot ROM slot, which I know he can probably get for 5 to 10 bucks each.
He didn't want my older OEM machine cases, but will take both of my standard ATX boxes for his commercial customer and let me have a new machine for either 350 or 400 bucks, similar to the 599 one, only with on-board graphics instead of a plug-in graphics card.
I can't use this junk I have laying around here anyhow, so glad to see he can use it.
As a good gesture, I'll bring him all my boxes of junk, he can throw away what he can't use from it.
Odd though, my other computer guy who did tons of work for hundreds of clients, never wanted anything I had, even when it was like new and still current.

Now I'm learning there is SATA I, SATA 2, and SATA 3. My how they love to make things confusing.
Old Mobo's seem to always have 4 SATA ports on them. The new ones look like they only have 2 SATA ports.
This seems odd since the Optical Drive, SLOT board, and Hard Drive all use SATA now.
So it looks like you can twin them at the loss of throughput, or buy an add-in card, or a SATA controller box.

This is one reason why I always take my computers to the computer man to do anything to them.
If I mess with them, they break, whereas, he knows what works and what doesn't, and how to connect things so they do work right, hi hi...

TTUL
Gary
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Re: Google Chrome's latest update NOT compatible with any

Postby Yogi » 14 Sep 2014, 11:37

Give me the mailing address of your junk tolerant computer guy. I have boxes of old electronics that I would have to pay to recycle, which I believe would cost more than shipping them to your computer buddy. I could discretely toss the electronic junk into the regular trash, and I probably will if I have to. But, if somebody can actually use this stuff, they can have it.

Power supplies have a tendency to die - something about electrolytic capacitors drying out. I have a 650W supply driving my nVidia card, three HDD, an optical drive, a NIC card, and the mobo of course. My audio amplifier system is external so that is not a burden to the system.

You might want to consider eSATA which is a way to connect external devices to your motherboard's SATA bus. My NAS has an eSATA connector and some computers have them built in as well. I'm not sure how many devices you can string out, but I think your power supply would be the only limitation.
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Re: Google Chrome's latest update NOT compatible with any

Postby Kellemora » 15 Sep 2014, 09:40

Hi Yogi

I'm heading over there in a few minutes and will ask him.
He does turn down most of my not too much older stuff too.

Seems I remember him saying some ATX after 2007, all ATX after 2009, ITX and BTX.
Confusing to me, because ATX applies to all different sizes of motherboards, standard, mini, micro, etc.
I had a whole stack of ATX power supplies, but NONE of them fit my ATX motherboards, because they don't have that extra four pin plug at the end of the main socket. They do have the four pin CPU plug.
Newer ATX power supplies have several SATA power connectors on them now. Where my machines had the jumper adapter from standard plug to SATA power plug.

And I'm getting in over my head again, as usual.

Off to order a new computer to be built for me. Have no idea yet until I talk to the guy what I'll end up with.
I'm an AMD guy, but it seems Intel is pulling back to the lead again.

TTUL
Gary
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