Printer failure

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Printer failure

Postby Ice.Maiden » 06 Nov 2013, 10:49

Oh dear, I'm here AGAIN.

Since getting my broadband and phone working, I photocopied a few items. Then I wanted to print off an email, but a window came up saying that there was a printer error. The printer driver was missing after I'd had the hard drive wiped, so another one was (apparently) installed.

Is Firefox not recognising something? The printer itself was working perfectly before all this, and comes on, but won't print off any emails. :(
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Re: Printer failure

Postby Yogi » 06 Nov 2013, 11:42

I hope you are sitting down for this, because I have some bad news for you. Correcting this problem will (most likely) involve tampering with those dreaded computer internal settings. I know how much you want to avoid that, but I can't think of another way to solve the problem without getting one of your techie friends involved.

So ... at the risk of causing some coronary distress ... I'll give you my take on what has to be done. :o

When your hard drive was wiped, the computer operating system was set back to it's "out of the box" condition. That means a myriad of settings have to be made to take the computer from its factory fresh condition back to your custom installation. Microsoft Windows doesn't know what kind of hardware you will be connecting, and thus they leave it up to the end user, you, to figure it out and make the proper settings.

All the hardware involved with your computer's operation needs what is called "drivers" so that it can interact with Windows as you would expect it to act. Microsoft provides a good number of the known drivers within it's Windows operating system. It's up to you to ferret them out as necessary. Or, in those cases where Microsoft does not supply a driver, you will have to go the the hardware (printer in your case) web site and get them from there.

Before you go into a panic mode, you should check to see if your computer is already set up to do any printing in it's current state. The way to do that is to open up your Control Panel and look for a category called "Devices and Printers." Click on that. You will see all the hardware that is connected to your computer at the moment, and hopefully under the "Printers and Faxes" section you will see your printer. If you do see it, then be sure it is set as the default printing device. Right click the icon for your printer and select "Set as default printer."

If your printer is in the list then go to your browser and start to print a page. You won't actually print anything at this point - you are just checking the settings. Click anywhere on a browser page and press ctrl + P (both keys at the same time). This should open up a small "Print" window. Right up at the top of the window is a line labeled "Name" The printer you saw in the control panel should be in that name box. If not, there is a drop down menu (the down pointing arrow on the right end of the name box) from which you can select the proper printer. Once your printer is in that name box, you should be able to print once again.

But, what if your printer is not in the list in your control panel? You will have to install the drivers manually in that case. There is an option in the control panel's "Devices and Printers" window to add a printer. That is what you, or somebody else, will have to do. Should it come to that, please get back to me. I can attempt to give you instructions on how to do it. I will need the make and model number of your specific printer as well as the name of which Windows operating system you are using, i.e. Vista, Windows 7, Windows 8, etc..

Good luck, and may the Force be with you.
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Re: Printer failure

Postby Ice.Maiden » 06 Nov 2013, 14:35

Oh Yogi ... I felt ill just reading that, but thank you for replying so quickly.

At least I understand what you mean, but correcting the problem might not be so easy for me, even though you've explained things in as simple a way as possible right now.

Since posting, I'm going to see what can be done tomorrow evening. If the printer still doesn't work, then I'll get back to you, and see if you can give me extremely simple instructions!

I managed to bring something up, which gave me the model number of the printer, but I have a horrible feeling that it's not the right one - but somehow from my old printer?? I can't find any paperwork now, relating the latest one. Would the model number be on the underside of the printer somewhere? :oops: I can't lift it up at the moment, because of my broken hand and arm.

Oh dear, when I feel ready to tackle this, I'll start by going into the control panel and slowly work from there, as you've suggested. Don't be surprised to see me back here, whimpering .... :shifty:
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Re: Printer failure

Postby Ice.Maiden » 06 Nov 2013, 16:42

Er .... my reply vanished! I've fixed it Yogi!!! Thank you! I almost DID have a heart attack, but sorted it out a while back. Checked again later to see if anything printed out, and yes!! The printer was set as the default one, but when I came to seeing if anything actually printed out, I noticed in the window where you click for however many copies you want, etc., that my printer wasn't the one showing at the top. I used the drop-down menu, clicked the right one in, and dare I say it, it's working beautifully again. Hope I haven't spoken too soon. You've been a great help.
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Re: Printer failure

Postby Yogi » 06 Nov 2013, 18:19

Perfect! You did exactly what needed to be done. It's very fortunate that the solution was a simple one. The next step would involve installing printer driver software. It is not easy to explain how to do that in simple terms. LOL
Anyway, sometimes those setting have a way of changing by themselves. Just check out the control panel and/or the Print Window to be sure your printer is the one being addressed.

PS: The model number is typically located out front by the company logo etched onto the printer's case. If not there, it's probably on a plate near the printer's power plug.
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Re: Printer failure

Postby Ice.Maiden » 06 Nov 2013, 19:24

Thank you very much. I know it would've been a simple matter for yourself, but I felt as though I'd climbed Everest when it started working! Ha ha ha. If you hadnt've advised me, I'd have probably waited until someone'd done it for me, and not watched! I just sat here looking at your instructions, and thought: Why wait until tomorrow? I MIGHT be able to do it (believe me, anything to do with computer problems is usually a total no-no). I decided not to wimp out for a change, but I shall keep an eye on things to make sure that the right printer's displayed. Thanks for the other info about the model number as well. I haven't checked that out yet, but at least I know what the model is now, and know how to check that things are OK.

As for printer driver softwear ... if I ever needed to ... would it be beyond me? Umm ... perhaps you'd better not answer that! Thanks again Yogi. : )
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Re: Printer failure

Postby Kellemora » 07 Nov 2013, 10:23

Don't WinDoze have Plug n PRAY anymore?

When something don't work for the frau, I tell her to unplug it, and reboot the computer.
After it's all booted back up, I tell her to plug it in.
A box pops up saying, Windoze has found new hardware.
Another box pops up saying, Windoze is installing your new hardware.
Then a box pops up saying, Windoze could not find the necessary drivers for your hardware.
Shall Windoze look on-line or do you have a floppy disk.
Insert floppy disk in Drive-A and press Enter.
We are sorry, the file dxclmrb34blmdr was not found on floppy Alice In Wonderland.
Please remove and insert correct floppy Windoze Drivers.
Do NOT Turn your computer OFF, Windoze is installing upgrades.
Two hours later.
Windoze has found new hardware
Windoze is installing your new hardware.
Windoze in not compatible with floppy drive.
Go out and buy a CD player.
Windoze has found new hardware.
Insert floppy in CD tray, and listen to it bang around.
OK, you just turned your CD player into a Cup Holder.
You can get your 200 dollar computer repaired at one of our fantastic service centers.
Today ONLY, we have a special offer, only 699 dollars to give you an estimate on repairs.
Was this tutorial helpful in solving your problem?
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Re: Printer failure

Postby Yogi » 07 Nov 2013, 12:21

Ice.Maiden wrote:As for printer driver softwear ... if I ever needed to ... would it be beyond me? Umm ... perhaps you'd better not answer that! Thanks again Yogi. : )


To be honest the process of locating the correct drivers might be a bit technical, but no, I don't think it would be beyond you. I can see it taking you two days instead of a few minutes, but you are perfectly capable of doing it. Unlike other operating systems, there is software for everything the average user would want to use with Windows. It's just a matter of finding it.
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Re: Printer failure

Postby Ice.Maiden » 07 Nov 2013, 13:48

Thank you. I hope I NEVER have to do it though. The above task made me feel bilious until it turned into euphoria on fixing it. : )

Gary, I've never used anything BUT Windows, so can't compare it with anything else. I think my fear of trying to solve things on my own partly stems from the relatively expensive equipment I'm using, and what it does. Knowing my luck, I'd make some massive faux pas, and so usually let someone else help me ( do it, in other words!). : )

My first main computer was an HP one costing £600. This one cost more than twice that, and I simply daren't mess around with it without I have someone instructing me. I hate doing things like that anyway, but fortunately, what Yogi told me to do worked straight away; an easy matter for those interested in it, but a nightmare for someone like me. I've since looked, and it was quite simple to find appropriate printer drivers which were available to install, but I imagine that actually doing it'd be a different matter for me.

I'm extremely grateful for all the help I've received, and I know that Yogi's quickly sorted problems out for another UK member on here. We both've only used Windows, so I suppose you get used to what you have, faults included. : )
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Re: Printer failure

Postby Kellemora » 08 Nov 2013, 10:17

As an aside Icey - When you bought your printer, didn't it come with a CD containing not only the drivers for it, but other useful programs as well.

That's where WinDoze users have the edge over us Linux users.
The CD that comes with the printer usually contains all kinds of Windows utilities for that printer.
But for Linux, they only include a driver to tell CUPS what to do, and little else.

One of the utilities blatantly missing for one of my laser printers, was the utility to change out the empty toner cartridge.
For Windows, it gave you a nice little graphical image of your printer, and a notice as to which cartridge was empty.
You pressed a button on your computer screen and the cartridge you needed to replace would spin to the front where you could replace it.
The printer itself did not have a control panel. So the only way a Linux user could change the cartridge, was to plug it into a WinDoze computer and use the WinDoze utility to do so.
I replaced it with the same brand, but the new one has buttons on the machine to do this.
It still does not have a Utility CD for all the other things it can do if connected to a WinDoze computer.

So yes, there are a lot of pitfalls to deal with, when running Linux, and using hardware made by those in bed with Mickey$oft.

Fortunately, more and more companies are beginning to cater to Linux users.
Unfortunately, they are companies who have horrible reputations. Like Hoglet Pukard, otherwise known as HP.
As long as I live, I will not allow another product made by them in my home or business.
They've burned me so bad, way to many times, to ever give them another chance.
And this was with all WinDoze computers and peripherals, manufactured by them.
Had nothing to do with Linux at all. But they were one of the contributors to why I moved to Linux.

TTUL
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Re: Printer failure

Postby Ice.Maiden » 08 Nov 2013, 13:09

Wow - that's amazing what you said about HP. In January of this year they won top honours in a competition, and the HP EliteBook Revolve won as the Best Notebook of 2013. OK., I'm using a desktop computer as I've always done. My old HP machine worked brilliantly for about 10 years, but I always used their ink cartridges and everything, with scarcely a problem.

My printer/scanner/photocopier's pretty smart as well, but whatever I think about Windows, two of my close friends swear by Linux. I think we could find little faults with both, but since I know no better, Windows suits me. I'm debating whether to install Windows 8.1 - which they say's much better than the 8 version? I have no idea. My use of computers's very basic, but things've been modified on it by my techie friend, and I'm scared of upsetting something. Some very clever stuff's in there, but I don't want to know!! So long as I can email, browse, do some office work and have more than one window open at a time, then I'm happy (while it works!). : )
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Re: Printer failure

Postby Yogi » 08 Nov 2013, 15:46

If you already have experience with Windows 8, then by all means do the upgrade to 8.1. Aside from fixing a few broken applications, they brought back some of the things desktop users demanded. You now can boot up into the familiar desktop environment, or if you are inclined to use the active Charms, you can easily switch over.

Linux, as Gary is wont to note, is the heart of many operating systems that were put together by separate bands of rebels - technically they are hackers, but I won't go there for the sake of arguiment. The rebels' cause was to offer a free replacement for UNIX, and coincidentally Microsoft's Windows. Frankly, they accomplished their goals. So if you are looking for a free replacement for UNIX, you should be interested in Linux. If you just want a desktop that works to your satisfaction, then stick to Windows. The only exception I'd suggest is a transition over to Apple Computer products which are an excellent compromise between Linux and Windows.

One other personal observation I will make about printers is that Hewlett Packard is the standard of comparison when it comes to printers. They invented printers as we know them and have more experience making them than all the competition combined. However, as good as they are at making printers, they suck big time when it comes to writing those Windows Utilities that Gary is talking about. If you stick to the printer drivers alone and don't install any other software from Hewlett Packard, you will have an ace of a product.
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Re: Printer failure

Postby Ice.Maiden » 08 Nov 2013, 19:16

Interesting.

By the way Yogi, no, I still have Windows 7 atm. I deliberately ignored Windows 8 after reading about the things you mentioned above - i.e. that desktop users weren't too happy about it. I didn't understand much of what I read, but it was enough to put me off. I may upgrade to the 8.1 version, but right now I'm just happy to be using my computer again, full stop.

I still haven't installed Word yet. I've found the disc though, so hopefully I'll get it on over the weekend sometime, and then be able to print things off as I need to.
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Re: Printer failure

Postby Kellemora » 09 Nov 2013, 11:47

I hate to go through all of this once again.
But before I get into HogPuke.
Since printers was brought up, I hope I get this right.

Toner based printing predates all other forms of printing.
Xerox invented the dry toner copy method in 1938.
They released the first Laser Printer in 1977, one year after IBM sold a clone in 1976.

Inkjet printing predates DotMatrix, invented in 1951, but not seen used with computers until 1976.
Remington-Rand developed the first computer driven ink based printer in 1953 for use on the Univac.
HP did not begin making an Inkjet until 1980, and it took them 8 years to get it working properly.
They introduced the first Deskjet printer in 1988, but did not improve on the design until 1992.

The first Dot Matrix printer did not appear until 1968, manufactured by Digital Equipment Corporation.
HP used a narrow 3-1/2 inch wide Dot Matrix printer made by Ford Aerospace in the First PC they constructed in 1980.

***

As far as HP home products go. I wanted to clarify first. HP made excellent commercial and hospital grade equipment.
But as far as their products built for home or small office use. Regardless of how many awards they paid to claim they won.
The company has almost no quality control. They DO NOT stand behind their products.
And for the most part, they have no idea what they are doing when they design their home products.
Like Kryzler, they may look neat. But as far as functioning properly. I've never seen any HP product that lived up to its claims.

HP burned me several times, with home use products, that either failed to work properly, failed to last out a year, or were just not compatible with their own equipment.

I was running ONLY Windows computers, from the DOS days, up through 3.11, Win95, Win98 and XP.
After using perfectly operating Microtech, Mustek, and other scanners, upgrading steadily as technology advanced.
Never having scanning problems in all those years, regardless of whether they were SCUZZY, Parallel or later USB.
Even after being burned bad twice already with HP's garbage products. Because folks considered them the best.

I normally purchased lower price computers. Most of my Win98 and XP computers were computer store assembled.
The year in question, I purchased a factory assembled computer, tauted the best money could buy.
It came with Windows XP-Pro MCE. Much of my existing hardware would not run on this brand new computer.
Until I contacted each company to get a DRIVER made especially for the MCE version of XP-Pro.
No Problem, every company supplied me with the necessary drivers. Including Kodak, Polaroid, Cannon, Lexmark, Logitech. In other words EVERY Hardware Manufacturer had MCE drivers, and they sent them to me for free.

Along with this brand new expensive computer, I went back a week later to buy a new scanner.
The store carried HP almost exclusively, claiming they make the best of everything.
I told them my computer had the NEW MCE version of XP-Pro.
Oh NO PROBLEM - The HP Scanjet 4670 is designed for that OS, it is a companion to the HP computer sitting there on the shelf.
I buy the Scanjet 4670 and go home. Install the Scanner and insert the Driver Disk.
There is no driver for the MCE version of XP-Pro on the disk. So I let the system install automatically from the auto-run.
The Scanner would not work. I spent DAYS with HP's help desk. We repeated the installation procedure numerous times.
No matter how many times I told them, my OS was the MCE version, they insisted it was still just XP, and their driver will work just fine.
After about Two Months of messing with them, I finally got through to their engineering department.
Finally, someone with some sense. Or so I thought. He had me make several changes to the Windows XP-Pro MCE operating files, downloading all kinds of dll's and making changes to the system registry.
When none of these worked, he said their must be something wrong with my computer itself.
He also told me, he was using an HP computer model number such n such, and it already has the scanner drivers built into the OEM version of the OS and it works perfectly.
He suggested I go and buy the companion computer that the Scanjet was sold with.

OK - Back to the store, they still had that exact model companion computer to the scanner.
It was VERY EXPENSIVE TOO. I didn't have that kind of money after just buying a new computer and scanner.
I went to EZ Finance and Screw Company and took out a high interest short-term Loan.
Went back to the store and bought the HP computer. A new one just came in, so it was fresh off the line.
The scanner still would not work, even though all the drivers were a part of the OEM install of XP-PRO.
Back and forth with HP service, and they could not get it to work either.
We are now Two Months and Twenty days from when I bought it. It was still under their 90-day warranty.
So they shipped me a new Scanner, and I shipped back the one I had.
The new one had the exact same problems, it did not work.
I eventually got back to their engineering department again, and the guy that worked with me before returned my call about three or four days later.
The brand new HP computer I just purchased did not have XP-PRO, it had XP-Pro MCE, the same as my other new computer.
This engineer took it upon himself to mail me the original HP OEM install disks for XP-PRO, identical to what was on his machine. The one the scanner worked on. They still claim there is no difference between XP-PRO and XP-Pro MCE, and their drivers were working perfectly.
OK - The CD's arrive, with a set of typewritten installation instructions from this engineer.
I had to completely wipe and reformat the hard drive on the brand new HP computer.
He included a utility disk in the set for doing this, along with a couple of other CD's.
I erase the hard drive, install the XP-PRO OS, and the other things included on other disks he sent.
I followed his directions to the letter.
WOW - The Scanner now works, it works pretty good too.
The imaging program STUNK compared to the QUALITY programs I was used to from other scanner manufacturers.
I installed my favorite programs, but the scanner would not work with them. So I was stuck using the HP imaging program.
But I could, after scanning, move the scans and/or use them with any other imaging program I wanted.
It was an extra step, but finally everything was working.

However, it did not remain working for very long. Less than a year, before I got a dark band on the edge when scanning.
I scanned the pages a little higher, about 1 inch, but the band kept getting wider. To the point I had to scan only 1/2 of anything at a time, flip it over, then scan the other half, and use a stitching program to put what I scanned back together.

At the time I purchased the HP computer, I owned two computers, custom built by Better Business World.
Plus the Brand New off the shelf Compaq Presario, and I now owned an HP computer, priced considerably higher than the Compaq.

Although I have purchased three more computers, since I purchased the HP computer.
And when I retired the two oldest computers built by BBW. They were still fully functional, working perfect.
Both had XP-Home on them, and due to age, had slower CPU chips in them, is why I retired them.

In my office, I had a (1) used Dell I picked up to use as a file server, the oldest computer in my line-up.
The (2) Compaq Presario, purchased just before I bought the HP to get the Scanner to work.
The (3) HP computer, a companion to the Scanner.
A (4) built-up computer from a local dealer, Asus 64 AMD 5200
(I also just purchased a new built-up computer for the wife, for down at the house)
And brought her older (5) Compaq Presario up to my office, with intent to use it to replace the Dell.

Of this line-up of Five computers. The HP, only one year and two months old, DIED. It was out of warranty.
I took it to my repair shop, they said the power supply was dead, and they could install a new one.
After doing so, they found that the old supply lost it's negative five volts and took out the MoBo when it failed.
The case was horrible to work with, so they recommended I buy a new case for 39 bucks, and a new Mobo that could hold the existing CPU and Memory Sticks. I had already bought the new power supply.
They hit more problems, and knowing me, they just built a whole new computer, using only the HD and CD from the HP machine.
This is the computer I'm now using, an Asus Athlon XII 250.

I took the OLD Compaq I got from the frau and replaced the DELL.

I'm currently running only three computers. My Compaq, same age as the HP that died, and the two Asus machines.
Since I chose not to go the File Server route any longer. I loaded Linux on her old computer and found I liked it better than WinDoze. So over the next couple of years, I slowly migrated all of my machines over to Linux.

The point here is: Because of HP, and their non-functioning equipment.
I was forced to buy a second more expensive brand new computer, and it did not work with the scanner. The very reason it was purchased. And this NEW HP Scanner, and then the Computer DIED before I finished making my Three Years of Loan Payments on it. While two computers, one over a decade old now are still running just fine.
Other than very short lived HP printers we have owned. HP burned me on an expensive Scanner, then CONNED me into buying their brand of Computer, at a time when I could least afford it. And it didn't even last 2-1/2 years before it self-destructed.
They LIED to me almost Daily for over THREE WHOLE MONTHS after I bought the Scanner.
When EVERY Hardware Manufacturer was providing Drivers for the MCE XP-Pro Edition.
HP REFUSED to write a driver for that OS, claiming it was ONLY XP and their drivers are perfect.

Before we were married, my wife owned several HP products, and every single one of them were problematic and short lived.

So I'm not alone in our decision to NEVER allow another product made by HP in our home, or use them in our business.

HP cost me a lot of wasted Time, and a lot of Money I didn't have to waste.
And I still had to use other brands of equipment to get my work done.
The OLD, no make that ANCIENT, Musetek Scanner I owned before I bought the HP Scanjet, was still working.
I went back to using it when the Scanjet died, and all during the time we were trying to get the Scanjet working.
It finally started messing about 1 in 8 images up, only a few months ago.
So I'm looking to buy a new independent flatbed scanner.
I'm temporarily using an 289 dollar all-in-one Canon solely for scanning.
However, when the ink cartridges ran out. It will no longer Scan.
There is NO LOGICAL reason to make a Scanner that REQUIRES INK CARTRIDGES to Function.
And I'm not about to buy ink cartridges to make a Scanner Scan and Canon is now on my BLACKLIST TOO.

I'm in the market for a Flatbed Scanner that works perfect with Linux.
And until I find one, NOT made by HP of course, I will use the frau's all-in-one on her WinDoze computer.

TTUL
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Re: Printer failure

Postby Ice.Maiden » 09 Nov 2013, 12:17

Hi Gary. You obviously had some bad luck with HP products, so it comes as no surprise that you're not too fond of them! Their products work for me though, so I've got no complaints.

I loved Windows XP, and could've upgraded the old computer to Windows 7, but was after a new machine - which came with Windows 7. I couldn't get used to it, so a friend altered a few bits to give the thing a bit of an XP look and feel about it! : ) I'm OK with it now though.

Must tell you about the time I contacted HP in the US, when I DID find myself with a problem though. I can't even remember what it was now, but the guys at the other end emailed me, and so began a daily chat. They admitted that my feeble questions brightened up their day, and a whole group of engineers'd gather round for a good laugh! They were fantastic though, and put things right for me, but I hadn't even contacted the right place when I first wrote. Brilliant bunch of people, who gave up their time to help me out - and to crack jokes. Yes, they were at my expense, but they explained why they found my conversations so amusing. It felt like losing friends when my problem was sorted and I had to say goodbye, and their final email was great. They all wished me luck, told me to have a good day and that they'd miss my ramblings! LOL!!!!



I'm now OK with it though
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Re: Printer failure

Postby Kellemora » 10 Nov 2013, 12:57

I hear ya. I got the same thing from them, after they finally connected me to their engineering department.
They asked a few questions, using acronyms I was not familiar with at the time. Like is your computer AT, ATX, mATX, BTX, ITX or SFF?
Um, I don't know?
You don't know what kind of computer you bought.
Yes! It's a Compaq Presario, store bought, not built-up like my other computers.
What series?
SR!
Oh, that's one of ours, Yes we can help get you going.
HP bought out Compaq?
Yeah, a long time ago.
I didn't know that.
So my scanner should work with it then right?
I should work perfectly with it.
It don't work.
What don't work about it?
And on and on and on...
I'm sure they felt I suffered from the ID-Ten-T error syndrome!

FWIW: I've had many commercial grade HP products that always worked just fine.
My high speed crash printer was made by HP, although it had a different brand name on it.
I don't know of any company that has had any problems with their commercial or hospital line of products.
Can't say the same for their stuff made for home use though.
Those who do have HP home products, may not know their device is not working up to snuff, unless they have used other brands to compare them.
At one time, I bought almost all Lexmark printers, because they worked great.
But like the Canon, I had a Lexmark with the same NASTY feature, it won't scan when the ink cartridges are empty.
It's a shame they did this, because I go through a lot of printers. And NASTY stunts like this, only get them BLACKLISTED.
I've had great luck and longevity with Konica/Minolta laser printers. So, as long as I'm happy with them, that is brand I keep buying. Both Canon and Lexmark make lasers. I have no idea if they are any good or not. Because of the all-in-one that would not scan with empty ink cartridges, I'll never know, because I won't take the chance of being burned by them again.

It makes no sense to me, why a company that may manufacture top-line products, would ruin their own business by offering a cut-rate model, then add NASTY features to it, that POs their customers? They would be better off either not offering garbage products, or not rendering the low-end products useless on purpose.
It's the ON PURPOSE, why I won't buy from them anymore!

Reminds me of RCA installing a specially designed Thermistor in their TVs, in such a way that the circuit could not be excluded.
A Thermistor is like a candle. It will only burn for so many hours before it runs out of fuel.
RCA used this Timing Device in their TV sets, so it would quit working after being on for so many hours.
So the owner would have to take it into an RCA dealer to have repaired.
It was easy enough to replace this Thermistor, IF you knew about it, and could do simple electronic repairs.
The purposely designed the circuit, so you had to use their grossly overpriced Thermistor, and could not bypass the circuit.
I think they did get into trouble over this. But the damage is done. Those who knew they did it, will no longer buy any RCA made products. And I don't blame them one bit. I know I won't buy anything RCA because of that blunder!
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Re: Printer failure

Postby Ice.Maiden » 10 Nov 2013, 16:55

A friend of mine used to use Lexmark printers, but I personally thought they were poor, and bought a Canon which I thought was superb.

Laser printers are apparently bad for the health though!

An Australian research team tested 62 recent laser-printer models from Canon, HP LaserJet, Ricoh and Toshiba in order to measure the levels of emissions they produced. Researchers tested the printers in an open-plan office, the sort of floor plan found in many offices around the world, and in a controlled chamber.

The tests showed that some printers emitted tiny bits of toner in the form of ultrafine particles (UFPs). These particles can penetrate into the lungs and, the study's authors say, lead to respiratory complications, cardiovascular problems and cancer. Dr. Lidia Morawska, the study's lead researcher, and her co-authors compared the health effects to those from cigarettes. The researchers fear that these UFPs may contain carcinogens.

Printers were assigned to categories based on level of UFP emissions: non-emitter (37), low-level emitter (6), medium-level emitter (2) or high-level emitter (17). Twelve of the high-level emitters were HP printers. Though they're similar in design, photocopiers produced no emissions. That's almost put me off HP laser printers now though!

The Canon PIXMA MG2220 Color Photo Printer with Scanner and Copier's a good one if you want something that doesn't cost much, but works well and loads the paper and cartridges from the front. I don't have that one, but I've seen the results, and everything's very clear, with no fading or colour change even after multiple copies.

Mine's an HP - dare I say - and the quality of photocopies's almost to photograph standard. I often print things out on ordinary paper instead of the photographic stuff, and they come out brilliantly, with the colours reproducing as seen.

Again, if someone has a bad deal from a particular company, they're going to be hesitant about buying products from them again. I gave Morphy Richards no end of chances, when I bought their irons and kettles, but they all gave a poor performance. In the end, I said "no more". I'd gone for cheapness and pretty good designs, but the latter's all I can say about them really. I went through various other products until I found ones which work well, look good and haven't let me down. It's meant paying more money, but since the stuff's lasting well, it's been better economy than to buy rubbish which works for only a maximum of 6 months. Two of the MR kettles popped off after about 4 weeks - obviously faulty. I got replacement ones, but they too, struggled to work for more than 2-3 months. So did those from some other well-known firms, but none of them cost over £30 tops, so I've come to the conclusion that you pay for what you get, although that doesn't work in all cases.

When I first moved here, loads of items needed replacing. I bought a washing machine which was in a sale for £100. When I pulled the sticker off (a non-descript name), it said "Servis" underneath. That washer lasted me for ages, doing up to 6 washes a day, every day. The only reason it went, was because the drum wasn't really big enough for our needs. I couldn't get duvets into it, so they had to be sent away to be laundered, which was inconvenient, but apart from what I use now, it was probably the best I'd ever had, cheapo or not.
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Re: Printer failure

Postby Kellemora » 11 Nov 2013, 13:09

Debi has a great photo printer, but she uses it so rarely, she has to buy new cartridges for it when she want's to use it.
When I need a digital image printed to picture quality, I take an SD card to the photo shop.
They offer both ink-jet and photo-finish. The ink-jet are cheap, and look as good as a photo.
But I usually choose the photo-finish, because it is REAL photo paper that needs developed.
It's still done using a laser, but rather than ink, the laser shines onto the photo paper.

You comment about emissions of printers piqued my interest. Especially where you said, photocopiers produce no emissions.
Almost every photocopier we ever owned, in business and at home, left a black dust on the things around it.
This is one of the reasons, photocopiers have traditionally been placed in a room all by themselves.

The higher the speed of the copier, the HOTTER the fusing elements heat. The hotter the heat, the more odor will escape the unit. But even so, the hotter they run, the less chance their is for particulates to escape the machine.
Toner is Plastic Powder. Plastic is not biodegradable. So if you inhale it, you would think it would stay in your lungs forever.
However, our lungs are self-cleaning. Things that get in them, work to the top and are coughed up as phlegm.
Not everything gets out of our lungs. Some things adhere, like asbestos, due to its fibrous nature.
Not every copier or printer uses the same type of toner. So, unless the type plastics used in the various toners are tested, I don't put much faith in a report about the emissions of various copiers, when compared to each other.
Hot air rises, so any machine that runs hotter than another machine, will carry odors and/or particulates higher in the room. And the more ozone there is in a room, the faster those particulates will fall back to the floor. Making them less likely to be inhaled.
And one last thought. Most printing companies now rely heavily on toner based printers, over offset. Especially for color printing. With several machines running all day long, and employees in those plants 40 hours a week. Has anyone ever monitored the number of printing plant workers who get cancer, verses a control group and other businesses?

I don't think they make any appliances as good as they used too. And since only three or four companies make each type of major appliance, often the name on the door makes no difference. It used to years ago.
I had an uncle who worked for GE. When I was in the market to buy a washer/dryer combo. He told me to go to J.C. Penney's and buy Pencrest Model such n such. It was less than half the price of the equivalent GE model. But was manufactured to last three times longer than the GE model. J.C. Penney's, since they did their own service work at that time. Had certain parts in the machine made so they had three stages of service.
The easiest example to explain is the clutch that drove the transmission and drum.
The Identical GE model, only had one clutch band. When it wore out. It had to be replaced by complete disassembly of the machine. The Penncrest Model had THREE clutch bands. Only one was in use of course. When the first clutch band wore out. It could be separated and dropped down out of the way, and the second one dropped down from it's storage place above the hub, and simply slipped into place. No disassembly of the machine required.
The Dryer also had a similar feature. The belt drive system and its belt tensioning roller arm. There were two of these in the machine, only one used. If it went bad, you just moved the belt to the new tensioner.
It did only have one heating element. However, it too was designed to be spliced if it broke, and three splicing clamps were held in a bag inside the machine. If it needed more than three splices, then you had to replace the heating element.
I loved those machines. They lasted for close to twenty years. I still had the dryer when I moved south. Used for the dog bedding, as we had newer washers and dryers. In fact, Debi was surprised to see we had three washers and four dryers in my basement, all connected and functioning. Two large upright freezers, a smaller upright freezer, and of course food storage shelves. As I said, I had that house exactly the way I wanted it for my retirement years.

When I redid our kitchen back home. Ruth wanted all new plates and saucers, all Pfaltzgraph or whatever their name was. It was expensive stuff, especially when she wanted everything they made. None of it held up for very long, so we reverted back to the cheaper stuff. Most of the cheaper stuff I still had when we moved south. But sold it at auction or donated it.
It really hurts when you ruin a very expensive piece of cookware, or it falls apart on you. And accidents do happen.
Also, Women LOVE to get new things.
With that in mind. If you opt for a lower price new set of cookware. After a couple of the pans go bad, or the glass lids break. Go out and buy a whole new set, that is hot for that season.

It took me years to get Ruth to quit buying all kinds of weird glassware.
When we built our new kitchen there, I purchased several cases of great looking glassware, of commercial quality, and stacked those cases in the basement. Then I filled the glassware cabinet with ONLY that style glass, in all of the sizes glasses come in. 2oz, 4oz, 8oz, 10oz, 12oz and 16oz. Plus coffee cups, and even separate tea cups. If placed in a certain way, they all fit in nice neat little rows. On two shelves. To keep them rotated, we used them from the bottom shelf, moving ones from the middle shelf down as needed. Just washed went onto the top or middle shelf. Same way with plates, they all matched too. She still managed to squeeze some oddball glassware up there from time to time, hi hi...
If one got broken, there were cases in the basement to restock from. However, doing it this way, if you get tired of the design, you still have a lifetime supply to use up. So, with Debi, I don't do it that way. We buy two sets, and when enough get broke, we go out and buy two more sets of a different design.
But, she still has her favorite pans she likes to cook in. So we do have odds and ends on the stove all the time.

I have three printers in my office. She has three in her office. Only two are used enough that they don't dry out or seize up.
The cheaper the unit, the more they charge for the cartridges. But if you hunt around, you can find aftermarket cartridges for a whole lot less. Even if they make the machine last not as long, so what. They now sell the machines fairly cheap, and KILL you on the toner or ink-jet cartridges. My 300 dollar laser, if I bought OEM toner cartridges, would cost 500 bucks to replace them. I go to an aftermarket dealer and buy all four for 150 bucks. If I go through four toner cartridge replacements before replacing the printer. I figure I saved 1,400 dollars, and if I buy a new printer, I still saved over 1000 dollars in four cycles.

TTUL
Gary
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Re: Printer failure

Postby Ice.Maiden » 11 Nov 2013, 14:36

Wow, that's a lot to take in, but hi there Gary!

Yes, I know what you mean about the residue from photocopiers. I wonder if they were referring to laser ones though, or to all types? Things are improving with modern copiers. A laser beam projects an image of the page to be printed onto an electrically charged rotating drum coated with selenium, but it's more common in modern printers to use organic photoconductors now. Even so, I'm sure that
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Re: Printer failure

Postby Ice.Maiden » 11 Nov 2013, 15:08

Wow, that's a lot to take in, but hi there Gary!

Yes, I know what you mean about the residue from photocopiers. I wonder if they were referring to laser ones though, or to all types? Things are improving with modern copiers. A laser beam projects an image of the page to be printed onto an electrically- charged rotating drum coated with selenium, but it's more common in modern printers to use organic photoconductors now. Even so, the toner particles ..... I don't know, but some must surely escape?

The Pencrest washer/dryer sounded OK. Someone in the family now has a shop which sells electrical appliances, and some models of whatever are manufactured by the usual names that we know, but sold under another company's name - often at less cost. I also agree with you about things not being made as good as they used to be. My grandmother had a freezer and a washing machine which lasted her 25 years! I don't think many manufacturers want that to happen, otherwise they wouldn't sell much, but back in the day, not everyone had these "modern" appliances, so their sales were far less than they are now.

As for other kitchen items, such as table wear and pans, I have to confess to using the best I could find. My pans might even last me a lifetime! I like using china crockery, because it's so delicate and attractive, but the best stuff's saved for special occasions, and so far - no accidents. Mugs are slightly different. Although I don't personally like drinking out of thick, chunky pottery, I buy them because a good few people trundle into the kitchen to make tea or coffee, and yes, handles sometimes come off or you might get a chip in them. They're easy to replace, so I don't bother with expensive ones, but I like certain designs on plates, and bowls, etc., and they don't go out of fashion.

Back to printer ink cartridges, I've never re-filled one. I bought new each time after a friend of ours advised against using the cheaper inks. They might work, but can, so I'm told, clog up your machine. Whether that's correct or not, I don't know, because I've never re-filled to find out, but then again, neither have I ever had a minute's problem with the actual ink from a branded cartridge.
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