Linux Command Of The Day

Questions, answers, and news related to computer hardware and software

Linux Command Of The Day

Postby kg » 27 Apr 2013, 22:50


A problem that developed on my new desktop brought about a very handy Linux command for information on installed RAM:

Code: Select all
sudo dmidecode -t 17

(Find Out Ram Speed, Make, Form Factor, Type and Other Information...there are several useful commands listed)

Basically, the command shows an output similar to this:

# dmidecode 2.11
SMBIOS 2.5 present.
Handle 0x0017, DMI type 17, 27 bytes
Memory Device
    Array Handle: 0x0016
    Error Information Handle: No Error
    Total Width: 72 bits
    Data Width: 64 bits
    Size: 2048 MB
    Form Factor: DIMM
    Set: 1
    Locator: DIMM1A
    Bank Locator: Bank1
    Type: DDR2
    Type Detail: Synchronous
    Speed: 667 MHz
    Manufacturer: 5185
    Serial Number: 05009F22
    Asset Tag: Not Specified
    Part Number: 72T232220HFA3SB


Naturally, the data is variable, and the above shows data for only one RAM card. Since I have four 4GB RAM cards installed, it showed one of the above for each of the RAM Banks I had available.

Notice I said 'available'...that's how I found my problem. I recently noticed that System Monitor was showing only 8 GB installed instead of the 16 GB I knew I had installed. Heck, the system came with 12 GB! I wanted to check my installed RAM, so I came up with a reference to the above command, which before now, I'd never heard of.

I ran the command from the terminal (I included 'sudo' because I had to use it to run the command) and came up with 4 separate screens of the output above, 1 for each bank of RAM I had available. It showed that Bank 2 and Bank 4 had nothing installed, though I knew they were definitely populated.

Since there was something awry, I shut the computer down, cracked the case, and inspected the RAM cards. Sure enough, the RAM card in what I assume to be Bank 2 had either become unseated, or I never seated it properly. I had taken it out to inspect it, trying to see if I could determine the speed of the RAM installed on it.

I reseated it, made sure it was properly secured, fired the computer up, and there was all my 16 GB of RAM...back in the saddle again! I realize that 16GB is a bit of overkill...in fact, the 8GB I was running is likely a bit more than I really needed, but when I have resources installed, I expect them to be available.

You'll notice that I highlighted "Speed" in red. When I bought the computer, the dealer said that the RAM was 1600MHz. I wondered about that, but bought a 1600MHz to install. I think we all know that if you install RAM that is faster than what is installed, the new RAM will run at a reduced speed to match the rest installed. Better that than installing slower RAM and dragging the speed of the rest down to match the slower!

Well, when I checked the speeds of the 4 cards, the original 3 were 1333MHz, with the new one at 1600MHz. No biggie...the computer is fast enough! Win 7 boots like greased lightning, and LMDE even faster. Programs launch with blinding speed; I couldn't be happier with its performance (for now).

I just thought this command might interest you. It's very handy for information about installed RAM, and I'm going to have to pull up the man page for "dmidecode" and see what other functions it might have. Just as a matter of interest, here is the output from my laptop:

# dmidecode 2.11
SMBIOS 2.4 present.

Handle 0x000E, DMI type 17, 27 bytes
Memory Device
    Array Handle: 0x000D
    Error Information Handle: No Error
    Total Width: 32 bits
    Data Width: 32 bits
    Size: 1024 MB
    Form Factor: SODIMM
    Set: 1
    Locator: M1
    Bank Locator: Bank 0
    Type: DDR
    Type Detail: Synchronous
    Speed: Unknown
    Manufacturer: Not Specified
    Serial Number: Not Specified
    Asset Tag: Not Specified
    Part Number: Not Specified

Handle 0x000F, DMI type 17, 27 bytes
Memory Device
    Array Handle: 0x000D
    Error Information Handle: No Error
    Total Width: 32 bits
    Data Width: 32 bits
    Size: 1024 MB
    Form Factor: SODIMM
    Set: 1
    Locator: M2
    Bank Locator: Bank 1
    Type: DDR
    Type Detail: Synchronous
    Speed: Unknown
    Manufacturer: Not Specified
    Serial Number: Not Specified
    Asset Tag: Not Specified
    Part Number: Not Specified


Since I'm sending this from my laptop, I don't have access to the information from my new desktop. I'll have to post that in a comment after I post this.
User avatar
kg
Honored 10k Club Member
Honored 10k Club Member
 
Posts: 10656
Joined: 06 Sep 2007, 23:45
Location: Godfrey, IL.

Re: Linux Command Of The Day

Postby kg » 27 Apr 2013, 23:02


Here's the output of the command from my desktop:

# dmidecode 2.11
SMBIOS 2.7 present.

Handle 0x0025, DMI type 17, 34 bytes
Memory Device
    Array Handle: 0x0023
    Error Information Handle: Not Provided
    Total Width: 64 bits
    Data Width: 64 bits
    Size: 4096 MB
    Form Factor: DIMM
    Set: None
    Locator: DIMM1
    Bank Locator: BANK1
    Type: DDR3
    Type Detail: Synchronous
    Speed: 1333 MHz
    Manufacturer: Kingston
    Serial Number: C920F718
    Asset Tag:
    Part Number: ACR512X64D3U13C9G
    Rank: 2
    Configured Clock Speed: 1333 MHz

Handle 0x0027, DMI type 17, 34 bytes
Memory Device
    Array Handle: 0x0023
    Error Information Handle: Not Provided
    Total Width: 64 bits
    Data Width: 64 bits
    Size: 4096 MB
    Form Factor: DIMM
    Set: None
    Locator: DIMM2
    Bank Locator: BANK2
    Type: DDR3
    Type Detail: Synchronous
    Speed: 1333 MHz
    Manufacturer: Kingston
    Serial Number: CB20C818
    Asset Tag:
    Part Number: ACR512X64D3U13C9G
    Rank: 2
    Configured Clock Speed: 1333 MHz

Handle 0x0029, DMI type 17, 34 bytes
Memory Device
    Array Handle: 0x0023
    Error Information Handle: Not Provided
    Total Width: 64 bits
    Data Width: 64 bits
    Size: 4096 MB
    Form Factor: DIMM
    Set: None
    Locator: DIMM3
    Bank Locator: BANK3
    Type: DDR3
    Type Detail: Synchronous
    Speed: 1333 MHz
    Manufacturer: Kingston
    Serial Number: D120C118
    Asset Tag:
    Part Number: ACR512X64D3U13C9G
    Rank: 2
    Configured Clock Speed: 1333 MHz

Handle 0x002B, DMI type 17, 34 bytes
Memory Device
    Array Handle: 0x0023
    Error Information Handle: Not Provided
    Total Width: 64 bits
    Data Width: 64 bits
    Size: 4096 MB
    Form Factor: DIMM
    Set: None
    Locator: DIMM4
    Bank Locator: BANK4
    Type: DDR3
    Type Detail: Synchronous
    Speed: 1600 MHz
    Manufacturer: Undefined
    Serial Number: A30EFA94
    Asset Tag:
    Part Number: BLS4G3D1609DS1S00.
    Rank: 2
    Configured Clock Speed: 1600 MHz


My laptop is even aging! I only have straight DDR RAM in it...not even DDR2. I bought it when Vista first came out, and frankly, I think it was borderline in being able to run Vista efficiently. No wonder I hated Vista! :P

I have Win 7 on the new desktop, but I'm fairly certain it could run Vista almost as efficiently. Not that I'm going to try it! :gah: :lol:

Onward and upward. I'm going to replace Ubuntu 12.04 with LMDE on the old desktop. I have the Mate Edition to install on it, since it doesn't seem to like Cinnamon. OK for what I'm going to use it for (until it bellies up!).
User avatar
kg
Honored 10k Club Member
Honored 10k Club Member
 
Posts: 10656
Joined: 06 Sep 2007, 23:45
Location: Godfrey, IL.

Re: Linux Command Of The Day

Postby Kellemora » 28 Apr 2013, 18:35

Interesting info Glenn!
User avatar
Kellemora
Brainiac Class Poster
Brainiac Class Poster
 
Posts: 3389
Joined: 07 Jul 2012, 18:52
Location: From St. Louis, current Knoxville, TN

Re: Linux Command Of The Day

Postby Yogi » 28 Apr 2013, 21:08

I've seen the dmidecode command before and have even tried it out. At the time it was just a curiosity and I could not see a real need for it. Then again, I wasn't troubleshooting hardware back then.

You might find these superman pages useful. http://www.linuxcommand.org/superman_pages.php
User avatar
Yogi
Oracle Class Poster
Oracle Class Poster
 
Posts: 7013
Joined: 04 Aug 2007, 19:37
Location: Chicagoland


Return to Personal Computers

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests

cron