Meme

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Meme

Postby Yogi » 15 Dec 2013, 19:54

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Re: Meme

Postby Kellemora » 16 Dec 2013, 11:39

Where on earth did you get this picture of my old office back home?

The only thing missing is the cobwebs hanging down from the ceiling, because no one could get into the room to clean.

I used to reink my nylon typewriter ribbons until they frayed, using stamp pad ink.
Then my new typewriters used carbon film. I learned to reuse those too, at least three times.
Rewind my own lift off tape cartridges using bulk rolls of the stuff.

And folks wondered why I spent so much money on early computers.
My first 9-pin dot matrix cost over 1,600 dollars. But it was a good one.
It probably paid for itself in the amount of supplies I no longer had to buy.
And I reinked the ribbons it used in the same way, hi hi...

Love that Pix Yogi!

TTUL
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Re: Meme

Postby Yogi » 17 Dec 2013, 10:58

My first printer was a 9-pin Epsom. It set me back $900. That was reasonable given my state of the art 8 bit (HP) computer with 16kb memory cost over $5000. Those were the days, my friend. While I had quite a few boxes of 132 column paper laying around, I must say my office never looked like the picture.
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Re: Meme

Postby Ice.Maiden » 17 Dec 2013, 12:29

Oh dear. Mine's resembling it.

:tiptoe:
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Re: Meme

Postby Kellemora » 17 Dec 2013, 13:45

To warrant spending the amount of money I did in the early days of home computing. I started a little billing company for small companies who wanted to look bigger than they really were. I think the reason I did so well, was because I had custom invoices printed for each company, using their logo and often the heading from their own stationery.
When the price of computers began to drop, so did my clients, because they were purchasing their own computers.

A faced a similar dilemma when I wanted to buy the WANG VS mainframe system for our family business. The only way I could do it, is if it could pay for itself. A large payroll company in our town was forced to move into a new building, due to highway construction. Even though they were purchasing some new equipment, they would have an extended downtime while they made the move. We had just enough room to allow them to install readers and printers and make use of our computer during their transition. The caveat was, we were only given a short share slot to do our work as they would need to tie up all the resources of the machine all day, every day. And we could not access the machine while they had their clients information loaded. Every day at around three pm, they would pull the top platters and run backup. Then wipe the lower platter clean, except for our little bit of stuff, and put our top platters back in. This usually took about an hour. So from four-ish to five-thirty, we did our daily work. Their use covered more than two-thirds the cost of the computer system. Which made it affordable for us to warrant the purchase. I loved that system. But sold it to a newspaper and replaced it with their OIS system.

Remember the eight inch floppies used with the Lisa system?
Both WANG systems we owned could read and use them.
Then everything went to 5-1/4 floppies, of which I still have several hundred in file drawers here.
I never did like the 3-1/2 floppies. The lost way to much data, and were always problematic.

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Re: Meme

Postby Yogi » 24 Jul 2014, 06:24

Where I worked we used 8" floppies well before Lisa was invented. I don't recall what computer box it was, but I'm thinking IBM. The cutting edge of technology in those days were drives that could r/w both sides of the floppy. I think that brought them up to a storage capacity of 512kb. Today they are putting terabytes on a thumb drive. :thud:
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Re: Meme

Postby Kellemora » 25 Jul 2014, 08:58

Hi Yogi

Yes I remember the old 8 inch drives. We could do the same PUNCH trick we did on the single sided 5-1/4 floppies in order to use both sides.
I still have file cabinets filled with 5-1/4 floppies, used them long after the 3-1/2s came out, because we lost way too much data using 3-1/2s.
I just looked at some of the boxes to see, but none of them give the capacity.
Some of the oldest just say SS,DD, other say 1S2D 48tp.

Here we go, from some actual boxes
3M diskettes - SS,DD,RH - single side, double density, soft sector, lifetime warranty.
SONY - MD-1D - Single Sided, Double Density, 48 TPI.
BONUS - 1S/2D, Single-sided, Double-density, Soft-sectored, with Hub Ring.

Seems like some of the early floppies were only like around 128 per side, then 256 later on?
I say that because I had to by new 5-1/4 floppy drives to read some of the programs I purchased, as my old drives did not read that density.

I rarely bought Double Sided, because I knew the disk was tested on both sides if at all anyhow. And the little punch made the cut-out notch to use the back sides. I also had a testing program to test disks. But as you recall, later on, disks were automatically checked and bad sections blocked out, so running a separate test was no longer necessary.

Hmm, I've not checked any of the computers I currently own to see if they can still read a 5-1/4 floppy or not.
I did take my most important 5-1/4s and safe them to CDs, but just now in snooping around my old file cabinets, I found two whole drawers I never saved the data from. Not that I would ever need it, I don't think.
A lot of them I keep merely because of the wording of the license and to prove I own the original licensed copy.
Many of them are Proprietary Fonts licensed for (all, indefinite) commercial use.
Today, font licenses have so many restrictions, or fees for uses other than what the license you purchased. Some have time frames, or the specific place it can be used. Such as on a magazine or book cover ONLY, etc.
But eons ago, they did not have all of these restrictions of where or how often you could use them. If you bought and paid their license fee, and had the original disk with their sticker bearing the license number, it could be used for ANY commercial purpose without restriction, and the license did not expire.
Not all of them read that way of course, some were restricted to pamphlets of no more than eight pages (2 printed pages folded), others were restricted for only inserted newspaper ads and flyers, a separate license was required to use in a magazine, or other areas.
I have several I bought for customers with single use licenses, to design their company logo using the font. These are recorded by the company who sold the font, showing I purchased it for use on XYZ companies logo. Nevertheless, I still keep the original disks and licenses together in my file cabinets. Although in my entire life of doing commercial printing, I've never been asked to show I hold a license to use a particular font. I figure, better safe than sorry.

Have a great day Yogi!

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Re: Meme

Postby Yogi » 27 Jul 2014, 09:49

The only problem I can envision with old data being read on new computers is the byte size. Back in the days of 8" floppies processors were 8 bit machines. I can't be sure but I bet I ran some that were even 4 bit. In any case, I think it would be hard to convert the 8 bit format to the 64 bit hardware we use today. I tried to install Windows 98 in a virtual machine but was told by the software that it can't be done; not enough bits. :grin:
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Re: Meme

Postby Kellemora » 27 Jul 2014, 11:55

I just got rid of a computer with a CGA monitor, that I installed a 5-1/4 floppy drive in. It was a 32 bit machine.

I got most of what I needed off the 5-1/4s and put the data on CDs. But now I'm finding more boxes I never copied to CDs as I unpack boxes from when I moved here over ten years ago. Most of the data is useless, but some of it is records of transactions, books and newsletters from days of yore. Perhaps they were saved on hard drives as I progressed upward through the years. But without looking to see what is on them, I don't know.

I'm surprised you couldn't install Win95 or Win98 in virtual box.
When I first started messing around with VB, it had a feature to do just that. I did hit a problem, but it was not with the installation, it was with running Win98, so I never tried Win95. The new computers run way to fast for these older programs.
I remember back when I bought a new fast computer, and was playing a game of solitaire. When I got to the end of the game, where if you win the cards all peel off one after the other slowly. They all peeled off in a split second. So fast you couldn't see it happen.
It was so long ago now, I don't remember what problems I encountered. Some had to do with missing DLL files, but I think most of the problems was the machine was just too fast or the programs didn't load fast enough.
Or the coding use was depreciated to far to be recognized, even in VB, when you tried to install an old program for Win98.

Back home, when we changed from the Lisa system over to the Wang VS mainframe. Wang took all of our 8 inch floppies and inserted the data from them on our Wang system. Arranged much neater than we had them originally. We were surprised they could do this at all, since it took proprietary programs to read and display the files. We had 3rd party programs for accounting and inventory, at least three different word processing programs, like word perfect, the Lisa writer, and others I don't even remember the names of anymore. Plus I had started some genealogy work on an apple II plus they also converted over for me.
All of it was converted to their own programs of course, but the fact they could do it without losing one bit of data, and believe me, I compared it all to make sure, simply amazed me.

Years later, when I went to change all of my data from MAC over to PCs, 90% of it could not be done.
Maybe if I still had access to a MAC I could have converted some of the stuff to a generic format.
But at the time, I was starting over from scratch, with only my disks in hand.
I sent them off to someone who said they could do it, and all they did was destroy the originals in the process.

I still have half a dozen 5-1/4 drives laying around here.
Perhaps if I can find time, I'll plug one in and see what happens, hi hi...
Now that I said that, I do know they make a 5-1/4 drive as an external USB drive, or did. I saw it someplace like Tiger Direct last year or the year before. Maybe not Tiger Direct but a place like them.

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