Apostrophes

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Re: Apostrophes

Postby Kellemora » 12 May 2013, 11:51

Hi Icey

I'll respond to this backwards, it will make more sense that way.

I was raised in a small home rule town that slowly grew to become a large city.
All of the municipalities around us were similar and grew at about the same rate.
Naturally with growth, law enforcement becomes big and growing issue as well.

As volunteer and appointed enforcement gave way to elected officials, who created departments and filled the jobs by trained and hired individuals. Things began to change rapidly.
I'm proud to say, all of the cities around us, except one Marlborough, had splendid and honest policemen.
The state eventually came in and shut down the city of Marlborough's crooked police. A blessing to us all.

However, we had something back home that is totally non-existent down south here.
All civil service workers, whether they drove a garbage truck, were firemen or policemen, they all had to follow the same laws imposed on everyone else. And although we may have moaned about how strict we felt some of these laws were, they were for the good of everyone.
I didn't realize how important these seemingly non-consequential laws were, until I moved south. I guess because everyone was more courteous due to these laws. Including our civil servants!
In fact, all civil servants were held to a higher level of obedience to the laws than the citizens.
And as the old saying goes, turn about is fair play.
In every municipality in our county, citizens were urged to report an infraction made by a civil servant.
We also had the three strikes and you are out rule, that applied to civil servants.
If a policeman for example, is reported by three different citizens (checked to ensure they have not teamed up against a particular officer), on three different occasions for committing the same crime (verified, usually admitted to by the officer), they were out of a job anywhere in the county.

After I moved south, most of the standard traffic laws down here are not enforced at all, much less right of way laws. And perhaps only 1 out of 100 of the policemen follow the laws themselves. They are very lax at writing tickets for laws they themselves do not keep.
I spent a good part of my first year down here, reporting illegal incidents to the police department. It did not good. Maybe two or three times they did something that didn't amount to a hill of beans. I finally gave up.
However, at that time, our street was patrolled at least twice daily by the county sheriff's department.
After the city annexed our street, most of the services we had totally disappeared and the police only come up here if called to a murder or during a bust of a meth lab.

Lack of police protection has caused things like burglaries to increase. And, as you said, most folks have insurance on the contents of their homes. But very few have insurance on old farming equipment left in barns or under shelters on their property. After the planting season, most of the equipment sits idle until near harvest time. You may have a combine in a barn that you don't even check until harvest time is coming near. You open the barn and find half of the equipment you stored in the barn from last year is now gone. To an insurance company, if it was insured at all, it has little to no claim value. A disk or harrow that is approaching 50 years old has no cash value, and is normally not insured. Almost anything that can be loaded onto a pickup truck by two people will come up missing. Taken to the scrapyard by thieves. Even old cars come up missing quite often. A dump truck used only during harvest time, on the farm, to catch the grain from the combine, gone.

I had one old riding lawn mower stolen since I've lived here. How do I prove I even owned it? Other than service records where I had it serviced a few times. But they don't prove it was THAT lawn mower. The sad part was, I just had brand new tires and belts and a new seat placed on it. I kept it in a storage shed behind my garage and used it every other week. So I don't know exactly when it was stolen. After the last time I mowed the grass, and before I went to mow it the next time. Although it was in a stand alone storage shed, the insurance company considers it part of garage stored items. The replacement of tires, belts, the seat, etc. is considered normal maintenance and does not add to the value of the mower. They look at the value as if you had to sell it right away, just a little more than auction value. Since it was in use and obviously well maintained, they offered the higher value of 200 dollars for its loss. However, IF I did claim it as a loss, especially as a theft loss, it would be entered as a claim against my insurance. My insurance wouldn't go up right away, but if I had another loss within 24 months of the same nature, it would mean an automatic cancellation of my insurance. So I didn't file the claim. Good thing too, because I had no claims, after the hailstorm, I was paid the higher amounts allowed. Not that it was anywhere near the amount of damage I suffered.
I do not carry replacement insurance, I only carry standard insurance. It is cheaper, and most things are covered at the replacement cost anyhow. If folks knew this, most would not pay the higher premium, when they do not get any real benefit from it. Basically what it boils down to, is insurance comes with a deductible amount. If you have replacement insurance, on most items, they waive the deductible amount. If you have standard insurance, they still replace the item at the current prevailing rate, but you pay the deductible. Most contractors will do the job for the amount you received from the insurance company. So you still are not out your deductible.

Here too, minorities get preferential treatment on almost everything. And poly-TICK-ians get their lions share from every transaction. I know I've mentioned that the amount of money to house 48 homeless calculated out to 18 thousand dollars a month each person. Yet only about 300 of that went to house the individual. The poly-TICK-ians pocketed the rest and/or shared it with their friends and family members, by giving them meaningless tasks to perform at exorbitant rates.

Reminds me of a joke, that is not all that far from the truth.
A section of the white house fence needed repaired.
They advertised in the newspaper for companies to send in bids.
They charge a fee to submit a bid, it's money they can pocket.
Only two companies made it to the final round of bidding.
The first company made all their measurements, calculated the materials and labor and presented it to the poly-TICK-ian assigned to handle the repair of the fence.
The second company did likewise and submitted their price.
A third man was watching all of this go on, and heard the first company submitted an 800 dollar bid, 300 in materials, 400 in labor, and 100 in profit for the company. The second company submitted a 700 dollar bid, 300 in materials, 300 in labor and 100 in profit for the company.
The third man leaned over and said to the poly-TICK-ian. I can do that job for $2,700.00
The poly-TICK-ian was shocked. Are you crazy, you just heard the other two bids, and you give me this outlandish price.
You didn't make one measurement, you didn't even fill out a submission and expect to get the job.
The third man smiled and said, of course I expect to get the job.
How you figure, asked the poly-TICK-ian?
He said it's very simple. one-thousand for you, one-thousand for me, and I'll hire the 700 dollar company to do the work.
He GOT THE JOB!

TTUL
Gary
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Re: Apostrophes

Postby Ice.Maiden » 12 May 2013, 16:20

LOOOL!!!! That's a good one!! : )

I'm sure there must be a grain of truth in it though, from all that you've said.

Where you've mentioned the politicians who share out money from transactions between themselves, that can't be done over here. Of course, there are "favours for a favour" sort of attitude amongst them, but no untoward activity regarding cash that comes in from the public - or extremely rarely. Money from the public purse doesn't always go to where it's earmarked for. It can be transferred for more "urgent" uses, but whether it's Councils or from the Treasury itself, everything has to be accounted for and tally up. The only time that anything "naughty" went off, was when, during the last Labour government, many MP's claimed false and exorbitant "expenses", which the public forked out for. This caused a massive outcry, and some of those MPs felt obliged to return what they'd falsely claimed for. I don't doubt it still goes on though, but in smaller, less obvious amounts.

Giving jobs to your relatives's a no-no. It's nepotism at its worst, and if such a person's found to've been given a job without that position being advertised as normal, or one's simply been created for him/her, there are severe consequences for anyone being caught. This actually happened at a school a few miles away. The Head Teacher found jobs for two of her relatives - jobs which she later pretended that she hadn't had time to advertise, let alone interview for, as the placements were "urgently needed. The first anyone heard of this was at the parent-governor AGM. The elected governor sided with her and tried to hurry the meeting along, but they didn't count on a few parents being incensed at the conduct. They reported it to the Education Department, and after further misdemeanours were found, the Head teacher was fired, and the school governor lost his position.

I was sorry to hear about your ride-on lawnmower being stolen. Over here, your home contents insurance often covers things which're left in garages, sheds - or even if washing's stolen from the line. Where possible, old receipts have to be shown for the missing items, but because most people throw the smaller ones away, they just put down the cost of the item on the insurance sheet and if they don't have a "new for old" clause to it, then they're paid out on the amount which's put down. No one can over-exaggerate a price, because these people roughly know the price of everything anyway. If you try to pull a fast one, they'll just drop the amount claimed for, and the claimant might end up out of pocket, so most folk are truthful about it all.

Everything on a person's property is insured, irrespective of age or value, but obviously this's taken into consideration when making a claim out. If you have a couple of 40- yearold spades which go missing, you just list them, but drop the price considerably, unless you can claim new for old on your policy. Providing you don't go over the top, the amount you put down's reimbursed.

When we had a huge fire in one of our sheds, the assessors were very thorough. They went through the debris with a fine tooth comb. The heat from the fire'd been so intense that metal objects's melted into each other. You could hardly tell what'd been what. We told the men all that we could think of at the time, and included two electric scooters which'd belonged to the boys. There was nothing left of them at all, but when it came to listing everything, we found we still had the receipts for them, so enclosed them with our claim and got every penny back.

The only other time that we've made a claim, was when we first moved into the house and the roof leaked. We found water'd dripped through one of the bedroom ceilings and made a small hole in it. The droplets fell down onto a fur coat which'd been lying across a spare bed and covered a patch of fur with red, rust-type residue. My OH said it could be sponged off, but this coat'd been handed down to me as a family heirloom, and I was scared of it being permanently damaged. It was a very small mark, about an eighth of an inch radius, but I claimed for it anyway. When the man came to inspect the water damage, I showed the coat to him, and he offered me an amount for it there and then - almost £1000. I accepted, of course, even though I told him that it seemed a lot for such a small mark.

As for our police, well I feel that the only people who complain about them are the ones who're up to no good themselves. You always get one rotten apple in any line of work, but I've never come across it, except for when a local officer blamed one of my son's for using a stick to smack down a bush in his garden! I knew he couldn't and wouldnt've done that, so asked the man who'd seen him do it. He wasn't forthcoming with a direct answer, but finally admitted that his own daughter'd seen him do it. He then rambled on arrogantly, pointing out that he was in two minds whether to take the boy down to the local police station and get him charged for wilful damage or something. I told him that I'd bring my son along myself if this was true, but first I wanted to hear what his daughter had to say. I then told him to get off our property.

I went round to his house the next day, and spoke to the girl. She sheepishly told me that it might NOT'VE been my son, as several children'd been playing in their garden. Her father was there, and demanded that she tell him again what she'd seen. He was a real bully type, and you could see the child was nervous. So then I said that if she'd seen him, she must've known what he was wearing. She described some clothes, and I turned to her father and said: "Now for a start, my son doesn't possess any black trainers - OR jeans (which he didn't at the time), and NOW, you'll listen to ME. My son wasn't even around - he was on a trip ...." and proceeded to tell him exactly where the lad'd been at the supposed day and time of the incident. The officer went beetroot red with rage, and spluttered that I'd better be able to back it up. "Of course we can," I said, and told him he'd been away on a school outing! It later transpired that it was the man's daughter herself who'd trashed the bush, and my husband went down to the police station and got a full apology in front of senior officers. Never seen the policeman from that day to this, so whether he was moved to another region or not, I don't know.
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Re: Apostrophes

Postby Kellemora » 13 May 2013, 09:05

Over here, it starts at the very top, with our President. Every president we've ever had, creates several new departments in the government that must be manned. More often than not, it is by those who helped him get into office.
It trickles down from there all the way to your local municipalities.
In short, our whole system of government is corrupt from the top down and the bottom up.
That don't mean there aren't a few good folks in office. But most if not all are in it only for the money the get for life.

On Insurance: For years I carried "Named Item" insurance, and for a good reason. I normally had more things and more expensive things, even when living in an apartment, than your average Joe.
Carrying this type of insurance was a major hassle, because you had to list each and every item. Then keep those files updated. We didn't have the internet back then, so it required sending a letter removing or adding an item.
Named Item insurance had two options as well, depreciated items, and replaceable items. In my case, I also had some items that appreciated (went up in value), antiques.

To give you a simple example of why I carried this type of insurance.
When I moved from my Kirkwood apartment, a company was paying for my move, so I took advantage of it and didn't move anything myself. The moving company would come in and box up everything, plus provide boxes for those things we wanted to pack ourselves.
They base their prices on how many square feet of floor space is in your apartment or home, plus what large furniture items you own.
The estimator came, counted the large pieces of furniture, including the washer and dryer in the laundry facility and the square footage of my storage closet in that area.
These estimates are what determined what size truck they would bring as well.

On the day they began packing to move us, they called in TWICE for more boxes and also to send out their largest moving van. They really lost money on this deal. They used 136 nine cubic foot boxes and 32 four cubic foot boxes, completely filled a full size moving van, plus the large box van they originally came with. And we still had to pack my truck and car with the overflow they couldn't fit in their two large vehicles.
The owner of the company came to our house to supervise the unloading of the vans, because he could not believe that much stuff could fit inside of an apartment.
As they were unloading the boxes, I saw the box that contained the contents of my secondary desk drawers, one that contained photos. I knew there was a photo of each room for insurance purposes, so I snatched that box and found the photos and presented them to him to look at.
Our living room and bedrooms didn't look much different than anyone else's, except everything fit perfectly and looked nice. It was very condensed because we only bought things that Just Fit and fit snug.
The appraiser did count every piece, he missed nothing.

You saw the photo of my Ham Radio Station behind my desk.
That is a 26 inch deep by 4 foot wide closet. 1,248 square inches, eight and one-half square feet is all.
It would be listed on a moving estimate as "contents of a standard double door closet."
Plus the desk itself would be counted as a stick of furniture.
You can imagine the amount of packing material and boxes it would take to safely pack up everything you saw on that shelf.
The closet holds 60 cubic feet and it was packed solid. It would take more than fifteen 4 cubic foot boxes to pack it all up properly, using packing material to protect much of the delicate equipment.
My entire apartment's storage spaces were packed just as solid, and I could get to everything too. Well, most of it anyhow.
And that is how it took so many boxes and their largest moving van, plus the original truck, for them to move me.
It also took them six hours longer than they estimated to load the trucks and another four hours more than estimated to unload it. Thankfully, I moved into a very large house and they could just set most of the stuff in the living room. Or they would have had to come back to finish yet a third day.

Glad to hear you had an alibi for your son, hi hi..... I often got accused of things when I wasn't even in the same state.

I'm also chuckling at myself. I was looking back at my other posts made today, before starting on this one.
I thought they were only a paragraph or two or three, and all of them are essay length.
I don't know how they get so long so fast.

I guess I just type way to fast, hi hi.......

TTUL
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Re: Apostrophes

Postby Ice.Maiden » 15 May 2013, 06:51

Hi Gary,

That's amazing! So when new presidents create new departments, do the old ones remain, or are they "instead of"? The mind boggles - although - fear not, we're trying to catch up!! Councils keep creating them over here as well, but at the same time, staff are being shaved, so I don't quite get the logic in that, unless it's to get rid of folk when a different political party get in, so as to hire their own. Looks like it!

LOL at you finding that some of your posts are "essay length". Well, mine aren't too far off either! : )

I DO try to condense them on purpose though, so if I don't reply to every comment you've made, don't think I'm being ignorant. As you see, it's hard to stay on track once you start discussing things away from the heading of each post, and yet this's the style of natural conversation isn't it? Maybe we should move this to Off Topic or somewhere? : )

We've had loads of well-paid, non-descript jobs advertised at various times. You know the type - Outreach Workers, Development Workers, Suggestion Officers ..... all on nice fat wages for doing very little. Nice jobs if you can get one though! Despite that, although money's wasted from the ground up, you rarely hear of any corruption. Each Council has a budget which has to be spent before the end of the tax year, so anything left over goes on things which're not very important, but which keep people working until the next financial year starts. That might sound all well and good, but they'll skimp on things when the coffers are full, or make sure that their offices are decorated etc., but this's while folk have to wait for ages to get other, more important things done.

As for insurance, valuable items can be insured separately - for probate or selling purposes, for instance, but your home contents insurance covers these items anyway. You can change the amount of the insurance cover if necessary, but most people are well covered to account for increase in value and more items brought into the home and so on. Things such as jewellery, paintings or items of great value are best being insured separately though, because photos are taken of your inventory and numbers issued which mean less hassle and more easily traced if your belongings are stolen, for example.

I had to laugh at all your packing boxes - but you're right! It's incredible how many things you accumulate over time, and I'd hate to have to start sorting things out if we were to leave here. It'd take three artics to shift everything!! Maybe more. : )

I haven't a clue how many square inches or cubic feet things take up! You're amazingly precise Gary! I'd just get someone in and say - look - here it all is. Bring in as many boxes as you think you'll need!" Certain items wouldn't go by carrier though, I'd move them myself to make sure that they were safe.

Yes, I had a very good and honest alibi for my son, but we were furious with the police officer. He upset my son, who had to stand there and swear he hadn't done anything wrong. Of course he hadn't - he wasn't even there when the situation cropped up, and it affected him for quite a while afterwards. This guy was so arrogant, and adamant, but I stood there and kept calm while he blustered on. He soon had egg on his face though. Not seen him since!
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Re: Apostrophes

Postby Kellemora » 15 May 2013, 10:38

Hi Icey

No, once a department is created, it usually lingers for decades after it no longer serves any useful purpose.

Some larger companies are almost as bad as the government with how they waste money on frivolous items.
But often, those in those larger companies are also involved in politics as well.
One of our top school board officials, who went on to become a representative in congress.
He spent over two million dollars on renovations to his office, while on the school board.
That is how he burned up the maintenance fund to get more funding each following year.

You would not believe how many thousands of dollars in antique toy collectables I lost, and that the insurance would not cover, even though they were insured. It's too long of a story to tell. They were in my office at work, and individually insured against theft, fire, etc. any known peril. But not insured against government seizure. Why should they be? Can't get that kind of insurance anyhow.

When I moved south, I auctioned off nearly everything I owned. That is how I paid all of my bills and became debt free before moving south. But I still kept personal items and some things I knew I couldn't replace. We also kept everything that belonged to Debi and her son's things we were storing for him. Plus things with my current and only desktop business.

I filled a garage with my work related items and two storage sheds with Debi and her sons things.
Since then, I've accumulated a whole lot more, and really do need to begin going through it and disposing of a lot of it.
I've lived here over ten years now, and have at least fifty boxes I've not unpacked yet. I know what is in them, and until I finish the house, they will stay packed. Most are room decorations of personal value, things that belonged to grandparents, etc. Not worth any money, just keepsake value.

Just like the fire hydrant I was supposed to have hit. Eye witnesses SWORE it was ME. Problem is, I was in Colorado at the time it happened. I often got blamed for a lot of things that happened in our town. More often than not, it was the son of the family who ran the drug store. We could almost be mistaken for twins, when we were young.
Of all the stupid things that happened when I was young, that often involved the police for one reason or another. I think the one that sticks in my mind most was when I was working at the Drive-In Theater.
We had a curfew like most towns and cities. And since more than half of the police forced worked for us part-time, they all knew I worked at the theater. It was only the equivalent of two city blocks from the theater to our home.
If I wanted to hang around for another half-hour after I was off work, I could ride home with another employee who went my way. However, I would normally clock out and walk home.
Realize that I am wearing a bright white Uniform, with the theaters logo and my name above the pocket. Usually carrying a folded up apron over my arm and the large white chef's hat in my hand.
The one cop would stop and detain me, often for over a half hour, at least once every other weekend.
Until the person who brought me home drove by and stopped to pick me up to go the last block home.

I don't think dad believed my story of being stopped by a cop as to why I was late getting home.
However, he got wind of this harassment by him from a couple of other sources.
He didn't want to rock the boat too much, but mentioned it to each of the officers who worked for us part-time.
They took the matter into their own hands and gave this guy the cold shoulder, without telling him why.

One of these officers was from another municipality, and over time worked his way up to Chief of Police.
His own son was harrassed by this same officer around the time I was being stopped on the way home from work.

You'll have to picture this in your head. There were only two main routes that led to the north, to where all the hospitals and doctors office were. To get there from our town, you had to pass through the municipality of our friend, now Chief of Police.
Fellow officers usually get a break from other officers when stopped for some minor infraction.
Not the case for this officer. The entire department was on the watch for him to do anything wrong while passing through.
They nailed him many times, and hit him hard for the offences. So much so, that he decided to take the LONG way around, anytime he had to go north. He never understood WHY he was not given professional courtesy while going through that town and often complained about it to other officers, who never had any problems.
Bob loved to tell my dad, we nailed Bozo again. Finally my dad said he should lay off the poor guy. Bob said, I have my reasons too.
The cop finally moved to another police department further east and was never seen again.

Another cop that was a lot of problems in a town out west, I've mentioned him before. He landed a job first with the county police and then later with the state highway patrol. All we know about him was that he did not last as a state patrol officer for long.

My son has a bogus "Grand Theft Auto" felony on his head, that will remain with him for life.
He was looking to buy a car and found a private owner with the car he wanted, and at the price he could afford, 1,500 bucks.
While taking the car for a test drive, he decided that he would buy it. He was told previously that the cracked aluminum key was the only one that would come with the car. He stopped and had a brass key made from it.
When he returned the car, he returned the key and gave the man 500 dollars in cash to hold the car until morning after the banks opened. Yes he did get a receipt for the cash. The receipt did not give any specifics, merely said, received from so n so, 500 dollars cash deposit and it was dated.
My son went to the bank, withdrew 800 dollars which he obtained in the form of a cashiers check, rather than carry that much cash. He then stopped at a service station in his car, to drop it off to the person who bought his old car for 200 bucks. Together they walked back to the bank to have the title notarized. He also called the insurance company to tell them he dropped off his old car and was on the way to get the new car. They said, no problem, you are covered for 30 days.
He walked all the way from the bank to the mans house where he was supposed to meet to buy the car, a distance of a little over three miles. He was supposed to be there and drive them to the title office. However, when he arrived, only the mans wife was there. She said he was called to work and would be home at lunch. He handed her the cashiers check for 800 dollars and the 200 dollars cash. He didn't ask for a receipt since it was a cashiers check and wasn't too worried about the 200 dollars. He asked about taking the car and coming back at lunch, since he walked so far. She said, I don't have the key. He said I have one that fits. Since she had the money in hand, she told him that it would probably be OK. He left and returned at noon, no one was home. He waited there for over an hour before deciding to go back home.
He phoned the guys house every hour, clear up until around 10PM, when he was supposed to meet some friends of his for a party.
He never made it to the party. He was stopped by the police for driving a stolen car. They impounded the car and took him to jail. I of course went and bailed him out. I also went with him to court, which was drawn out for over four months.
The man who owned the car got it from the impound yard, after presenting the title and paying the fees.
It was stolen from his driveway the very next night and wrecked by whomever stole it. The key in the ignition was the brass key my son had made. So he was blamed for that second theft also. The fact the police impounded the car with the brass key made no difference. They said he had more than one key made. Which turned out to be true, he had two keys made. And unfortunately, could not produce the second key. He doesn't remember getting the second key from the key place.

On his side were the receipt for the 500 dollars, the cashiers check stub for 800 dollars, nothing for the 200 bucks.
And a notation by the insurance company that he changed the policy from his car to one he was going to buy.

It was only his word that they offered the car to him for 1,500 dollars, and they agreed to meet in the morning, then at lunch, etc. They were now claiming it was supposed to be 2,500 dollars, so he had not paid for the car yet. His wife said, after giving me the check, he just took the car.

At the third court hearing, they had a witness who claimed they saw my son in the car, at a particular hang-out on the night it was wrecked. My son had no solid alibi for that particular night for the time the car was stolen, nor for the time it was wrecked. He did have an alibi for an hour before, an hour in the middle, and an hour after the time of the accident.

The attorney we hired kept saying, everything is only circumstantial. There is enough proof that the sale of the vehicle was intended and that the seller was amiss in completing the sale. That took care of the first charges being dropped.
But then the second theft of the vehicle, and the accident, the attorney could find no way around. They had a witness that placed him in the vehicle after it was stolen and before it was wrecked. Unfortunately, the witness was credible and not related in any way to the man who sold the car. And my son did see him the day he had the car, but it was three days earlier. The witness swore that he saw him on both days, driving that car. And that was all the judge needed.
We still had to appear in court one more time for sentencing. The fine was very high, we had to pay the full 2,500 dollars the man claimed, and he got several hours of community service. No jail time, but would have a felony over his head the rest of his life.

We tried to get the insurance company to cover some of this, but they refused, since the sale transaction never completed and it was questionable whether the sale would ever complete.
This felony over his head has cost him much grief over the years. He was denied advancement in his chosen profession, could not get licensing in another similar profession. Just a lot of headaches his entire life over that incident.

I eventually learned about where he was the night the car was stolen, and who he was with. However, even if I knew at the time, it would have done no good as far as having a witness to his whereabouts. And he may have ended up in even more trouble. Let's just say, it would not be a good reflection on the case and may have compounded the issue.
He didn't use drugs, but was in a very high drug area, with those known to be dealers in such things. The friend he was with, well lets just say, he was definitely not a good reference, always in trouble for something illegal.
We are sure the judge would have said, this guy put him up to stealing the car, instead of proving he didn't.
At least my son changed some of the friends he hung around with over that incident too.
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Re: Apostrophes

Postby Ice.Maiden » 15 May 2013, 15:31

Oh I'm SO sorry to hear that! It's awful for parents isn't it, when they see their kids get into trouble. Your son was probably completely innocent, but the way things looked, there was no recompense for him. It's a harsh lesson in life that you never pay out for anything like that until you have it all in writing and ownershi[p's legally turned over, but kids sometimes forget the minor details in their haste to get a car or whatever.

I remember a friend of mine having a whole load of trouble after advertising his old car for sale some years back. Two "iffy-looking" teenagers turned up straight away to have a look at it, and paid the asking price on the spot, with cash. My friend handed over the keys, but had to take their names and addresses, saying that he'd (genuinely) post the log book on later, as it meant keeping them waiting otherwise, while he searched round for it. It was a weekend anyway, so they said that was fine, and happily went off with the car.

What a wally!! The next day, before posting off the log book and letting the DVLA know of the change of ownership, the police were at his door. The car'd been found abandoned after a minor crime was committed. No such address existed, and so, as my friend was still the legal owner of the car, he got the blame for whatever'd happened. He showed the cash which he'd received, and it tallied with the asking price in the ad, but that meant nothing. He DID, however, get away without being fined. While enquiries were going on, the two young men were apprehended about something else. Their prints were on the car, and one finally admitted where they'd bought it from. It was only that which saved my friend from a lot more trouble, but his father was furious with him for being so stupid. He wasn't allowed to have another car until his "punishment period" was over!! : )
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Re: Apostrophes

Postby Kellemora » 16 May 2013, 11:04

I know I mentioned this in the past. I was charged with hitting the back of a van. Although the insurance company figured out what happened. I could not get out of the ticket, just because of the way the laws here are written.

I had a similar incident where I was sitting at a red light and a truck in front of me rolled backwards into my car. Only in this case, he admitted it was his fault.

However, on the first accident I mentioned. I was actually sitting still then also. Evidenced by the skid marks where I stopped. A car stopped in the highway to make a left turn. The van didn't stop and hit the car in front of him, knocking that car into the stopped car waiting to make a left. I was the fourth car in the lane and seeing the stopped car, slammed on my brakes and came to a full stop over 25 feet behind the initial impact area of the van and second car. I had come to a full stop before the van hit the car in front of him. The van bounced backwards and landed on top of my hood, doing no damage to the front of my car at all. As would have happened had I hit him.
The damage to my car was very minimal, and he had no damage to the back of his truck, other than a bumper bracket bent slightly upwards.
The front of his van was of course totalled, smashed clear back into the engine, as was the back of the car he hit, the trunk pushed almost to the rear passenger seat. The front of that car and the back of the stopped car had less damage.
In other words, it was quite obvious the van hit the second car and knocked it into the stopped car.
And the debris in the street clearly showed where the impact points were along the roadway.
Now even though the insurance company could figure this out easily. Our police are not the brightest bulb on the tree.
I was initially ticketed for causing the chain reaction accident. In other words, I was blamed for hitting the van and knocking it into the second car which in turn knocked it into the front stopped car. The only thing was, all of the evidence proved otherwise. So, the part about being the cause of the chain reaction was dropped. However, due to the way our laws are written, because the front of my car had damage and the back of the van had damage. I'm still at fault, even though he rolled backwards into me.

Jumping aside for a minute. Having a relative who was an insurance investigator. He told me stories many times about car accidents that the police could simply not understand at all. He said when two cars collide, they do not hit just once, they actually hit two or three times.
Despite the mounds of evidence he had to prove this. No one would ever believe him. (I think today his theory has finally been proven to be fact.)
What evidence did he have to prove he was right?
Items stored in the glove box of the car crashing into another were found smashed between the two vehicles.
A family that was traveling had some small suitcases, like makeup cases, sitting on the deck under the back window, behind the seat. One of those was found smashed into the headlight bucket of the car they hit head on.
The only possible way, these items could be smashed between the cars like that, is if the cars hit, bounced apart and hit back together again.
He had other evidence, involving small children that were in the back seat, too gory and sad to mention.

One of his favorite stories had to do with a four car pileup. The hood from the first impacting car (the one causing the chain reaction), was not only smashed between the front and second car, but it had TWO IMPRINTS smashed into it, both from the front of the second car in the line. The imprints were over two feet apart, one showed the nearly undamaged front of the car, and the other showed the second impact damage just as clearly.
To him, this meant the hood of the striking car separated and landed between the two cars, before the result of the impact chained itself up the line. The evidence proved it did pass through car number 3 before going over the top of car number 2.
I think this hood is what prompted further investigation into his theories.

When I was driving OTR. I saw an interesting accident. Actually I saw several, but this one was unique.
A little Ford Econoline Van, the one with the engine in the middle, had a tire blow out, causing him to swerve into the side of a large car, something like a big old Buick. Everything looked like a delayed reaction rerun. That little van bounced off the Buick like bouncing off a brick wall and pieces began flying off the van. The Buick didn't falter for at least 5 or 10 seconds, before it began swerving, trying to regain control as he pulled off the right side of the road.
What should have been nothing more than a sideswipe type of accident, kept escalating as pieces came off the little van.
It wasn't until we were all stopped and I was looking at the van while waiting for the highway patrol to arrive, that I figured out exactly where all the pieces were coming from.
This type of van has three doors on the passenger side. The front passenger door, and two doors that open like french doors on the side cargo area.
What it looked like to me, non-professional opinion of course. Is that the front side cargo door caved in allowing the rear side cargo door to come open, driving it against the side of the heavy Buick, breaking it's hinges. This may be what shoved the van sideways. Then the door came off the top hinge, swinging under the van until it got caught under the back right tire. That's when the sparks began to fly, until the lower hinge broke, allowing the door to wrap partway around the wheel and sending it up into the back of the van, knocking the back rear door open, and some items from inside the truck were knocked out onto the roadway.
All of this happened in only a matter of seconds. So there were pieces and sparks flying everywhere. I was far enough away that I pulled off and stopped behind the Buick. While the van was a good 1/4 mile ahead of us, by the time he spun and swerved and finally got his truck off the road. He pulled off onto the right also, but most of the pieces from his van were on the left side of the road and in the left lane. A few passing cars knocked several of those pieces further off to the left.
The Buick had one long scratch from the drivers door to just past the back window and a small vertical dent about an inch behind the drivers door, probably from the van door. The door handle on the Buick was large and probably what pushed the front side door of the van in far enough that its back side door popped open making the dent.
It was just amazing to me that all of these pieces came flying off the van and doing more damage to the van, from a simple sideswipe type of accident. Also the delay before the Buick began swerving.

Speaking of cars, I just got bad news about by hail damaged SUV that we just put $3,500.00 worth of repairs into.
The rear bearing in the motor is shot, which means another 3 grand to replace the motor.
It's also about time for new tires and they have gone up considerably also. They will be close to a grand also.
Still cheaper than buying a new vehicle! It's just a shame this one has all the hail damage now.

I did plan on keeping it, because I began looking for another just like it way back in 1999 and never found one comparable.
And this junk they make today. I won't have any of them.
We were looking for a Mustang Convertible for the frau, but finally decided on another Blazer. One that we had to put a new motor in also, then some other work, like front wheel hubs a few weeks later.

We had a 1993 Jimmy that we replaced the wheel bearings, entire AC system, transmission and rear end in, plus had some major work done to the motor. It ran like a top, no complaints there. But little aggravating things, like the electric windows kept breaking. Not the motors to them, but the clips that hold the glass won't hold the glass properly anymore.
Rubber hoses to the dashboard controls and devices that make the switching of vents and the like, seem to keep breaking, one after the other.
So when this 2002 became available, I snatched it up and took it to have a new motor installed.
Getting a new motor is also a nightmare. The first two they sent out, had problems. A new motor should not have the kinds of problems these did. Fortunately, I didn't have to pay for the place to keep swapping out the motors until they got a good one.
For my Blazer, I'm taking a like new motor. It was a new motor that had a bad valve or something. I'm buying the short block and replacing the heads. It will still have the new motor warranty, and beats buying a used motor. Although I have got some great used motors in years past, when I knew the original owners of those engines. Down here I don't have any reliable contacts for things like that. Nor do I do any of my own work on cars anymore.
Which means, I always have to pay out the big bucks to get something done.

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Re: Apostrophes

Postby Ice.Maiden » 16 May 2013, 15:00

Aww, I sympathise. We've had several vehicles that cost the earth in repairs, but because we liked them, they were kept. We had 2 Probes on the road at the same time, and one developed a major fault. It had to have a new engine, but they aren't made any more, so an engine fitting something else was put into it, which was fine, except for the cost. By the time it was all put right, the repairs cost more than the actual car, which we'd bought second-hand. I had a Jag before what I've currently got, and it was horribly expensive to run. Even small things, like when something went wrong with a sensor, which meant the key wouldn't work, cost a small fortune. The knob on the gear stick'd got scratched, so I wanted another one. Just a small aesthetic thing, but it cost £30 for a replacement. Even well-fitting rubber mats to protect the carpeting were expensive. Cars can be dear things to keep and maintain, but if you need them, then you have no choice do you?

Where you mentioned sitting at a red light and the truck rolled back into you, annoyingly, when that happens over here, it's always the car behind who's at fault, whether it really is or not. I was travelling with a friend of mine, and we came to a steep hill with some traffic lights at the top. We were second in line. The lights changed to red, but the car in front rolled back on us, causing a bit of damage to his back and our front bumper. The drivers got out, and the man admitted that it was his fault, but it would've been my friend's insurance who coughed up, so he offered the guy some money, which he accepted.

Yes, I'm sure that most insurance investigators have some tales to tell - and not always amusing ones either!

Like you, I've seen accidents where car parts and metal's flown across the road. It's usually caused by one or both vehicles speeding though, isn't it? Cars and vans are quite robust against average knocks, although not always. I once saw a van, pretty much as you described, with sliding side doors, bang into a little car. The car's wing mirror shot up in air, and the actual offside wing split in half.

One of the worst near-accidents I witnessed, was when an open-backed lorry lost some of its load. Tyres bounced out of the back of it and headed at speed towards traffic behind it. One hit a car and shot up and over its roof towards the car I was in. It was only by a quick reaction that my driver swerved out of its path. We didn't pull up, but the lorry driver did, and two or three cars who'd been in the queue. He'd have really been in for high jump with that one.

None of our cars've been home-fixed, so garage work's meant a heck of a lot of money being spent over the years. I've never owned a brand new car, so it's usually been mine which've developed problems! The Jag was the nearest to it - only about 3 years old, but it didn't accommmodate the children and/or friends, so i wanted to change it. Nice to drive round in for a while though, the same as the nice BMW that was provided as a courtesy car when mine was smacked into as someone tried to overtake on the inside while we were waiting to make a right turn (think opposite in your case). : (
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Re: Apostrophes

Postby Kellemora » 17 May 2013, 15:05

When I first started to drive, I had very old cars.

Actually, living on a farm, I was driving long before I was allowed on the street in a vehicle other than a tractor.

I learned to drive in a Ford model BB, which is a doorless truck, the body was made of wood.
At that time, it was still used around the farm as a service truck.
When I turned 15, I started restoring a '46 Ford Deluxe. It found one heck of a lot of use after it passed to my cousin. Was even used on a trip from St. Louis to Kansas for a KU football game. The owner at that time, painted it KU Blue and had a row of VW Bug's, also painted Blue, follow him the entire way, like a long parade. Cute.

When I turned 16 and could drive on the street, I used a '55 Ford Custom, that belonged to the family, but passed on to me.

After that, I had a '62 BelAir, like new, only a year old when I bought it in 1963.
I traded it in on a new car, and drove new cars, getting one every six months, for the next five years.
Then I got married, and no more new cars, so often, hi hi.....
I did have a brand new car the year I got married, but the next one didn't come until four years later.

In the interim of getting new cars, I often picked up a slightly used car as an extra, or a special purpose truck.
At the time I married Ruth, I owned four pickups, two vans, and one box van, plus two cars.
Within the first couple of years, I got rid of everything except for two pickups I needed for work and one of the cars.

None of them ever cost me much money to maintain, not even the older ones. I don't recall ever having a major problem with any of my work vehicles. Although later on, I had some mighty expensive repair bills on later made cars.

The only really cool car I owned, considered unusual, meaning not made by the Big 3, was a Bricklin. It had the seagull doors and was like a smaller sized sports car. But no where near as small as the Fiat Sport Cars I owned.
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Re: Apostrophes

Postby Ice.Maiden » 17 May 2013, 17:49

Sports and deluxe cars are fine, but it's the insurance which adds up to a lot - and fuel consumption can be bad. By the time our eldest son gets his first car in a couple of year's time, I hate to imagine what the insurance'll cost us. You're talking in the region of £2000, give some either way, and then there's everything else on top.

My OH's had new cars, but not me, even though some've been in excellent condition. Even so, they mostly get something go wrong with them which necessitates forking out.

Like you, I started driving on private land before I was old enough to get a licence. Then I took a few professional lessons to make sure that I got used to driving on roads where other vehicles were, but actually, I'm not what you call a "natural" driver. I don't enjoy it very much, especially through towns. It stresses me, having to change gear constantly, particularly when some idiot crosses in front of you or doesn't indicate to turn left and you have to slam the anchors on. If I have passengers who're trying to yak away to me, that makes it worse. I'm not a nervous driver, I just seem to get all the maniacs out at the same time as me, so i tend to keep quiet and concentrate.
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Re: Apostrophes

Postby Kellemora » 18 May 2013, 11:33

I was sorta the opposite when I was younger, much younger, hi hi.....

I put on an average of 100 miles, nearly everyday, after school and then later in the evening after I got off work.
Back in my era, we would cruise all the drive-in restaurants. Schneithorsts, Parkmor, Steak n Shake, Ted Drew's, White Castle, etc.
After graduation, and working real full-time jobs, we often only met on weekends for our cruising, but we made up for it by making the rounds several times on Friday night, and sometimes all day on Saturdays and Saturday nights.
We thought nothing of jumping 30 miles to downtown, or even crossing the river into the next state where many of the drag strips were located.
With most of us having full-time jobs, and not married yet, we all had the latest and greatest muscle cars, and even beefed them up considerably.
When most others burned out, or got married. I had turned to racing. I no longer had new cars for myself, but owned several hobby cars and even built a few dragsters. Like in 1968, I won enough money that I bought a new 1968 Camaro for personal use, and a used 1967 Camaro to use for racing.
I also had a more responsible side as well. I began driving OTR, the big rigs, for our family owned business. This landed me several other OTR jobs driving for other companies. During my time of driving OTR, I amassed 1.8 million accident free miles.
There was a huge bonus coming up at 2 million miles. However, I had so many close calls my last six months of driving. After one particularly harrowing experience, I quit. Everybody prodded me to drive that last 200k miles for the bonus. But I didn't do it. I valued my life more than the money offered, hi hi.....

I still loved to drive though, and my wife and I went on numerous sport car rally's and other mild, safe, sporting events.

Heck, I always quip that Debi and I HAD to Get Married!
The logic was simple. I couldn't afford that 1060 mile round trip every other weekend for a dinner date.
However, getting married didn't stop those round trips. It took several trips to move her up to St. Loo, and several trips to move her back to her home town, plus the trip back home to visit her parents, and then even after we moved down here, the trip back to my home town to visit my mom.
I put over 50k miles on my car our first year together.

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Re: Apostrophes

Postby Ice.Maiden » 18 May 2013, 22:56

There's quite a big difference between youngsters in the US and the UK getting their first cars.

Most kids want to learn to drive and get on the road asap, but it happens later here (in general). It's not really a status thing over here, like across the pond. Unless our kids have their own money, then it falls on parents to buy them their first vehicles, and most are usually second-hand little runabouts, simply because of the costs involved. The car, the tax and the massive insurance can put a strain on family finances in many cases, so some youngsters don't even think of taking lessons until they've finished college, uni or have a contributory wage coming in, and the situation's becoming worse over here because of the employment situation. I know some teenagers who'll probably never own a car until they're in their late twenties or thirties - if at all. That'd probably be unthinkable where you live, but many of our kids are more concerned about where they're going to live one day, or if they'll even get a job to finance living away from home, so a car'd be a luxury for them, and probably not a priority.

However, I think it's important to be able to drive, for all sorts of reasons, but before they even consider getting their own vehicle, they have to get through their driving tests first. These're being made more and more difficult. First they have to do the theory test, which includes hazard perception and which's all done via computer now. This's then followed at a later date by the practical test, which also includes being asked questions about the engine and so on. If they manage both of these, then they get their full driving licences, but it can be an expensive job getting there. I had a few lessons before I was considered ready for my test, but these days, it's not uncommon for new drivers to have 20, 30 or more. Then you have the cost of both tests on top. If someone fails their theory test, they have to take it again - at further cost. They can't take the practical part until they have the theory. It's fine for those who're able to pay, but there are may who can't.

In the early days, I loved speed, but because my children came along quickly, I soon learnt to drive carefully - and far more slowly than on my previous trips out. There's no way I'd risk their safety.

Bombing around in a car when you're in your teens is more of a male thing, I think. It's a status symbol, a babe magnet - whatever - but I think that most females see cars in a different light; not all, of course, but from a more practical point of view. Boys and their toys really does seem to be true, and a first car going at speed gives an adrenalin rush. I don't find speeding attractive, maybe because I've been a passenger in so many "scrapes" that it put me off.

Oh LOL - you must've cared for your wife a great deal to do all that driving around for her - but your quest ended in triumph! 1060 miles for a dinner date? I think that's more than driving from one end of our country to the other!! : )
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Re: Apostrophes

Postby Kellemora » 19 May 2013, 10:20

There is a vast difference between folks who live in the large cities and those raised way out in the rural areas.
Or in some cases, smaller condensed communities that became like compact little cities.

I've lived in some of those very condensed areas for short spurts of under a year, and having a car would be an expensive nuisance. Almost everything you could or would want to do, was within walking distance. Grocery stores were like only 4 to 5 blocks apart, so you usually never had to walk more than 2 blocks to get to one. Hardware stores were more like 6 to 8 blocks apart. We had 3 book stores in the block I stayed in. And we had 2 strip malls within 6 blocks, one was over 2 blocks long itself. Like turning back the hands of time to the 1940s or earlier.

I was raised in a small town that had almost everything we needed. But it was a little too far to walk to most things. Bicycles were a common transportation. However, for many things, we had to go to the next town over, or head the 30 miles to downtown. Plus, most of our farm produce was delivered to downtown as well. And as a florist, we had to deliver the flower arrangements, etc. It would be almost impossible to run a farm in the '50s to current, without owning several motorized vehicles. Although, when I was very young, although we owned several tractors, we still had plow horses that were used for some things, mainly to keep them fit.

I think I was born at just the right time to experience both the old and the new ways of doing things.
As a kid, I shoveled coal into our massive boilers and watched as they installed stokers. We still had to fill the hoppers by hand, but it lessened the amount of shoveling into the hot boilers. More efficient too, because you were not always opening the doors to feed the fire, only to pull out the clinkers. Naturally this was not as efficient as the package boilers we installed later that ran on oil, or the later natural gas fired boilers.
Many of our vehicles were hand cranked to start them. Plus several of our equipment items used the old one lung motors with the huge flywheels. I learned to operate and maintain all of this old equipment. Some of these were still in use when we closed down in '84. Loved the sound of those old one lungers.
We had a sawmill that used to be run by a one lunger, that we later used the side flywheel on a tractor with a long wide belt running up to it. We also had several hydraulic ram pumps that clicked and clacked merrily away day and night. And skinner lines that watered entire fields like an oscillating sprinkler.

I wouldn't want to trade the experience of my childhood, by starting in more modern times, for anything in the world.
I don't miss the chores of course, but they were an experience in and of themselves also.
Not many kids these days know of all the different types of hand pumps we used, or even how they worked.
We also had tap water. But until you've quenched your thirst by cranking up water using a chain-ball pump and keeping it in an old oak bucket, dipping some water out in a tin cup, shared by all, you don't know how good chemical free water once was. It had all the necessary cleansing bacteria in it, that people today try to avoid. They don't know what they are missing!

From my house in St. Louis County, Missouri, in the mid-western USA, down to Debi's parents home in Knoxville, Tennessee, one of the southern states, was exactly 530 miles. Which isn't really all that bad when you consider the other gal I was conversing with, before meeting Debi, lived in southern California. That's over 1,825 miles ONE WAY, or 3,650 miles round trip.
Debi is worth her weight in gold. June will be our twelfth anniversary, and to date, we have never had a cross word between us. Which is Ironic, considering that we are almost as different as night and day. We don't like the same things, don't eat the same foods, have entirely different interests in sports. However, we both love animals, although at first she didn't care much about birds, but that was because she was never around exotic birds. She loves Moocher to pieces and wouldn't let me give him away for anything. Due to my COPD, I had to find a new home for Jessie. Her cousin, only 1 block away, gave him a good home. It also means I can go visit quite often too.

People, including many doctors, don't know the difference between the types of birds. Which is why I had to get rid of all of my birds when Ruth was suffering from advanced COPD. As far as my COPD, I knew Jessie the Cockatoo would have to go someday, because Cockatoo's are a powder coated bird. They put out so much dander, my office always looks like it snowed in here, hi hi..... Birds like Moocher are protected by oiled feathers. As such, they do not produce airborne dander. Heck, our dogs put out more dander and dust into the air than most birds.

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Re: Apostrophes

Postby Ice.Maiden » 21 May 2013, 09:44

Hello Gary,

Yes, I know what you mean about folk who live in towns or cities. They're often close to work and all amenities, so very often don't need a car, especially if public transport's close to hand. I was brought up in the countryside, but even then, you're never very far from a city, unlike places in the US where you can travel a good distance before hitting one. I had to grin where you said that Debi's parents were 530 miles away from you, which you didn't think was too bad! Ha ha ha!!! Thirty miles'd seem a traipse to US lot, and to take a car that distance for pleasure purposes? Hardly ever! Youngsters seeking nightlife might have to travel 15 miles max, and most don't usually take their vehicles because they're going out to drink. Mind you, as I say, the percentage of teenage car drivers over here's much lower than in America anyway. Those wanting transport'll often invest in scooters and small motorbikes, because they're cheaper to buy, insure and maintain.

From a personal point of view, I think it's best to learn to drive while you're young, to get it over and done with, but on the other hand, most road accidents are caused by folk between 17-24 because youngsters find speed exciting. We've all been there, and your awareness of the dangers really doesn't kick in properly until you're a bit older, does it?

When I was about 16, I was a passenger in a car that decided to overtake a lorry in front. We were touching 90-100 mph, and started to overtake just as another lorry came round a sweeping bend towards us. We had no time to pull up, and shot between the two, with just a couple of inches to spare on either side of us. We were lucky, but screeched with laughter at the "perfect judgement". Makes me shudder to think of it now. We could've easily ended up playing harps for ever more!!

Oh you brought back a lovely memory about cranking cars. My dad had - and probably still has - an old one which needed a starting handle to get it going. I'm sure it was an old Ford of some type, and my grandad used to own it before him. It wasn't really taken out on the roads, but every so often, she was started up - and went! I'll have to check whether he still has it. : )

My first car was a mini which my mum passed on to me. I loved it! It was an old Cooper S, which, despite being another one which'd stood for a while, went pretty well. It was probably 15-16 years old when I got it, but the bodywork was perfect, and it didn't take much to get her back on the road.

I sometimes wish I'd been born earlier, because I missed out on some great fashions and music, but apart from that, no. Think I was an "in-betweener" though. I had an ideal childhood, full of fun and long lazy days, although my schooling wasn't too healthy! I moved around to 3 of them, and didn't like the rigid rules and the colossal amount of homework I had to do, but the education itself was of a high standard, and at the end of it all, I did pretty well and was grateful of the opportunities it gave me.

I was never into the latest gadgets though - ever. While friends were sometimes getting their first home computers and showing off their phones and so on, I was more interested in horse riding and going to sporting events - where horses were! I loved horse shows, polo, even racing. I can remember my first trips to Royal Ascot and Goodwood, and I loved the buzz of it and the people who went there. It felt really good at 12 or 13 going into the enclosures and having strawberries and cream in between the actual races! Ha ha ha. What was I like!!!

Aww, it was sad about your cockatoo having to go, but your wife's health was more important. Is it the psittacosis disease which those type of birds carry? I know that parrots can get it. Not good for anyone suffering with asthma or COPD in particular. Dander can be bad as well, but parrot disease's really dangerous to human health.
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Re: Apostrophes

Postby Kellemora » 21 May 2013, 11:34

Hi Icey

Sounds like we both enjoyed our childhood and teenage years!

Neither of my sisters had the wonderful experiences that my brother and I were privileged to see and do.
By the time they were in upper grade school, my family already moved west. So only us older boys still came to the greenhouses and farms.
It is really hard to explain the difference between one town and another, although further into the rural areas, the new town my dad moved to was more modern. Farms gave way to subdivisions and newer shops and stores and schools.
Almost all of the things my brother and I did when we were young, were long gone by the time my sisters were old enough to play. My brother, four years younger than me, just barely got in on the tail end of the old days, before our town became a city and everything changed.
I think my own son, grasped much more of my life than my brother did. Mainly because for five years, beginning when he was like four years old, he lived and played on the same grounds where I was raised. I also still had all the pictures and could show him how things changed a little each few years as I grew up. We lost the majority of those photos in the man made floods. I know, it took a lot of rain, hi hi..... Long story, see dikes that failed.

Fred was the large cockatoo I had to get rid of because of Ruth, along with all the rest of my birds at that time.
Jessie was the cockatoo I just gave to Debi's cousin, because of my COPD.
I still have and will be keeping Moocher, my blue fronted Amazon parrot. He poses no threat to my breathing.

The easiest way to explain the difference between Jessie and Moocher is:
Jessie is a powder protected bird, and Moocher is an oil protected bird.
Jessie put out so much dander, that my office always looked like it snowed inside.
Everything covered with white dust. And the air filters had to be washed at least once every three days to prevent them from clogging up with bird dander.
With Moocher, I only clean the air filter once per month, which is standard practice, bird or no bird.

Wholly Cow, it's 12:30 already. Gee, time flies when you are having PHUN!
I need to run and feed the pooches, eat lunch, and get to the rest of the folders in my work bin.

TTUL
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Re: Apostrophes

Postby Ice.Maiden » 21 May 2013, 19:24

Good early morning Gary,

Hope you enjoyed your lunch , and that the dogs enjoyed theirs!

Yes, my childhood was brilliant. My parents were quite strict, and yet we were all given the freedom to pretty much do what we wanted. There were just rules that NEVER had to be broken, such as when we had a time to be in by, we were expected to adhere to that. I failed miserably on a few occasions, and then got told off! LOL. We couldn't always have the friends that we wanted to, either. My father in particular could be quite judgemental, although he'd never be rude to anyone who came to the house. I think on reflection they were right though, but as we all got older, we discerned for ourselves anyway.

I think each generation feels that in some ways, they missed out on something from the past, but if life's good to you, you don't think about it a great deal. If I had my time over again, I'd probably do exactly the same as what I've done so far. No complaints really. I've seen and done a lot in my years, that some are never lucky enough to do in a lifetime, but it's the way it goes. I'm also one of those people who MAKE things happen, if you know what I mean. If something didn't turn out the way I expected when I was young, I didn't dwell on it - I'd still go after what I wanted, but try it in another way. You know the saying: If at first you don't succeed .... well I'm a big believer in that, and things mostly turned out well. I always say that you never know until you try, but if I don't want to do or try something, wild horses wouldn't make me. I'm very much my own person, but learn from those who know better than I do.

As to your birds, well if your health isn't affected by having Moocher, then that's fine, but it was maybe for the best that Jessie had to go. Breathing in those particles's no joke, however much you love your pets.

A relative of mine bought a share in a race horse a few years back, but couldn't get near to it as he was allergic to the animal. When he comes here, he can't go anywhere near the horses, but he's fine with everything else.

I know what you mean about towns expanding. It happens all the time over here. Villages turn into small towns, and then some developer gets the green light to build more houses - and so it goes on. It'll never be more built up round where I live, but I like it that way. I've lived in London, and although I was quite happy there, strolling round a public park's not quite the same as having open fields and woodland around you is it? The actual living's completely different though. In cities, everyone's bustling round, hardly seeming to have a minute to themselves, but a more gentle lifestyle suits me now. I'm always busy, but it's in my own time, if that makes sense.

Right. Off to see if imhotep's come back on. He posted on Internet Memes earlier on, and I told him you'd been on "Fixing Stuff" in the Off Topic bit, so don't know whether he's had chance to say hello to you properly yet. Chat soon anyway.
Last edited by Ice.Maiden on 22 May 2013, 17:43, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Apostrophes

Postby Kellemora » 22 May 2013, 13:42

Being one of the oldest children in my generation and being around the really old folks too, they always talked about what life was like as they grew up and got older.
I still think I was born at the perfect time to enjoy a bit of the old, with more labor saving conveniences.
Technology always marches on. However, there was a huge leap in what was available while I was young.
Many homes still did not have electric or indoor plumbing. Neither did my parents until I was age two.

My grandparents on my fathers side had all conveniences from as soon as they became available.
However, my grandparents on my mothers side, were often the very last to get anything, sometimes by many years.
They still had a privy when I was in my teens. And did not have indoor running water until I was at least 20.
When water lines did get brought down their street, they only had a spigot down by the road. From it, they would bring a hose to fill their cistern when needed.

My elders told such great stories about their past lives, I almost feel like I lived during there era. I used many of the same things they did, simply because everything was still there on the farm.
Our family had a homestead house that grew as children got married and had kids of their own. It's the way great-grandpa wanted it. The entire family under one roof. But that didn't happen as his kids built homes and businesses of their own.

Our family does have a rich history in the development of our town. Involved in most of our community growth. Something of which I'm very proud of. And in the way they handled most things.

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Re: Apostrophes

Postby Ice.Maiden » 22 May 2013, 18:06

Hi Gary,

Love the last paragraph of your post - you SHOULD be rightly proud of your family's input in the development of your town. I suppose the same's happened within my own family. Going back to when electric lights were put in homes, ours was the first in the area to have them. Same with indoor toilets - and people from further down the village used to go up and try to peer through the windows! LOOOOL!! Nosey devils, but I suppose you couldn't blame them. Must've been a novelty!

I think it must've been my great- grandparents - not sure - but they apparently had a phone installed when no one else did, and they all had cars as soon as they came out. It was considered very "posh" back then.

Then we come to me. I think I'd started a backwards trend! Ha ha ha. I don't particularly like gadgets, except for the labour-saving ones. Luxuries, so to speak, like - well, like my children love to own - don't really appeal to me at all. I could easily live without my mobile phone, I dislike TVs, hate microwave ovens and food processors, and don't like laptops!! I need a computer, but if they all blew up tomorrow, I'd survive without one. I'd even survive without the car. I quite like the Amish way of life in a way - slow and simple, although their religious views might not meet my own.

I'm a family-orientated person, but like my own space as well. I don't get bored when I'm on my own, because there's always something I can do - or have to do!! Even so, when all my family are around me, I love it. I don't understand the people who, even in jest, say that kids are lovely - when you can hand them back! I've heard no end of grandparents say that, but I can't wait for the day when and if I become one. I have stacks of patience with children, and I adore babies. I think the best time of my life was when I had my two and even though there were some tough times when our youngest was little, and then when he became ill, the caring for him was just a natural thing to do, and I'd do it all again. I love being with friends and having fun, but home's where the heart lies.
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Re: Apostrophes

Postby Kellemora » 23 May 2013, 12:26

I'm often told that I'm the perfect Hermit.
I can sit in my office from sun up until sun down and never be bored.
Or at least that's what the people outside of my office think.

I'm getting olde now, and no my days are getting shorter, and I have tons of things I want to finish before I croak.
And because we need money to survive, many of the things I consider important, MUST be moved off the priority list.
Because without the necessities of life first, the rest is not important. And who is interested anymore?
Everyone cares about themselves, and don't give a diddly squat about what great grandpa did or their history and ancestors. It seems only when folks get older do they look back and wonder, how did we get here.

My grandpa passed on something to us from his father that is very relevant.
Each successive generation will be required to do more work for less pay (meaning disposable income).
A dollar will go further on some things, but overall, it will have less value and buy less and less.
There will be an ever increasing amount of things you must buy, just to survive.
And mark my words, as our government grows, the amount they take to waste, will increase, and increase faster.
Your sons will make more money in a day that I made in a year, and have nothing saved up to show for it.
Because everything they need costs more, so much more, that nothing will be left and their status will decline.

Well, I've lived to see it. How about you?

TTUL
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Re: Apostrophes

Postby Ice.Maiden » 23 May 2013, 15:49

Ah ... that's the first of your posts which I'm going to find it hard to answer.

As for being a "hermit", I think writers DO have that tendency to want their own space, plus, of course, for work reasons.
The room I'm in now, I've almost comandeered as my own little office, but it's not really. My daily schedules are run from here, so it's a hub of activity. Then I pass things on to other people, and in between, have family and home matters to deal with, so this's why I seem to spend a lot of time at the computer. I'm fine with what I need to do, and because I'm at home, can basically stop whenever I want to, but I like to get things organised and done with.

I think that your grandpa spoke some very wise words, although perhaps not every statement he made's going to be true for all of us. I worry about the state of the world and what my sons and their children'll live to see, but I have the comfort of knowing that my children'll never go without.

Now what you said about everyone caring for themselves, I have to disagree there, no disrespect to your comment. I don't know if you're speaking from personal experience or have a general view of this from what you see or've seen, but from my own personal point of view, no.

There are some folk who don't seem to care about anyone - or perhaps only themselves - but by the same token, there are thousands of kind-hearted, thoughtful and caring people around. I believe that what you give out, you receive back.

Over here, it's becoming the "in thing" to know about your family history, and it's important in our family anyway. Our ancestors kept diaries for years, and they build up into a magnificent insight into the times they lived in, and their thoughts on life. Our children are brought up to respect this, and to learn about history and the arts. Not everyone has that chance, and should I bring out the "family albums", the kids groan, because they've seen them so many times, but that's just a natural reaction when you're young. They did, and do, ask lots of questions, and we always make time to answer them.

However, they could both probably do a family tree which'd go much further back than some other children of their ages could. This's because it's been drung into them, and to try and keep up with family traditions and values whilst embracing the new, so to speak. They're both still young teenagers yet, but the eldest has a maturity about him which makes me burst with pride. He's very bright, capable and charming, and you just know when your kids are going to turn out well.

My mother, who hit the heady years of peace and love, was, non-the-less a very astute person, with good perception. She brought us up well, and to understand things which many parents don't give a thought to. She also encouraged us to work hard to and to care for others. We've done the same with our two.

When we were at home, we'd all sit round and "put the world to rights". Nobody's opinions were scoffed at, however naive of us at the time. Our thoughts on all subjects were actively encouraged, which gave us confidence when speaking within a group. Daddy'd sit there discussing historical matters. We talked about how things came into being - all philosophical and quite deep, but he's an interesting speaker, so we hung onto his words, then formed our own opinions.

When I have my friends over, we don't just chat away idly. We have plenty of laughs, but we debate, and yes, the subject of how we got here in the first place's cropped up many times Gary. Age has no bearing on it. I don't, for instance, sit here mulling things over, but when issues arise, I listen, learn and then have my own say. I find it all quite interesting.

I value different ways of seeing things. It gives me a deeper perspective of how people can be so diverse in their reasoning.

I've been fortunate to meet some very intelligent and amazing characters, I've travelled a lot, I've seen so many wonderful things, but good grief - like yourself, I haven't finished by a long chalk! Two years ago, I could've died. I've had to slow down due to health issues, but it brought with it a wisdom . It made me realise that what my mother and grandmother used to talk about made sense - not that I didn't understand anyway, but more so, due to my predicament. With that in mind, I bless every day that I have a life with my wonderful family. I'm not interested in being bigger or better than anyone else, or wanting to kill myself with over-work. None of this matters. I still have ambitions which'll materialise when the time's right, and I see my children following in the same pattern.

Life's good, but we mustn't take it for granted.
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