Apostrophes

This forum is intended for our members to discuss issues related to authoring.
Forum rules
-Topics related to authoring are encouraged in this forum.
-Original works created by our members are desirable.
-The general Code of Conduct rules apply to this forum.
-Be prepared to show authorization to publish copyrighted content.

Re: Apostrophes

Postby Kellemora » 14 Jun 2013, 10:43

The surface itself is virtually indestructible.
It's the water that would get into the seams and cause the pressboard it is mounted on to puff up.

However, the two brands I have used. Scraps that I tossed on the waste pile outside, never deteriorated.

When I first bought laminate flooring, way back when I was a general contractor. I learned several installation tricks, which make them sound more like walking on hardwood, than the clack clack of a normal installation. It was also half the price for the underlayment to do it that way. Although everyone said it wouldn't work, we used it in a car dealers show room where cars are pulled in and out all the time. The underlayment never failed.

We have a few very old pooches, who don't always make it to the doggie door.
When Debi was working, and I was in my office all day.
Well, you know what I'm driving at here.
The floors never suffered one iota of damage.
So we began wet mopping and running Scoobie.
The floors look as good as the day we installed them.
Except for one spot where a battery leaked. It only made the surface whitish. No harm otherwise.
User avatar
Kellemora
Brainiac Class Poster
Brainiac Class Poster
 
Posts: 3389
Joined: 07 Jul 2012, 18:52
Location: From St. Louis, current Knoxville, TN

Re: Apostrophes

Postby Ice.Maiden » 14 Jun 2013, 14:45

That's a good recommendation then Gary. : )

I've never lived anywhere that had that sort of flooring, but a friend of ours recently decked his flat out in laminated parquet flooring. It looks very nice as well.

I think the only trouble with "wooden" floors are that they look "cold" to me. That's one of the reasons we lay big rugs down, with just the woodwork showing round the perimeters in each room. Also, if you get fed up of your flooring, or it starts to look dated when you don't want it to, it's not so easy to simply rip it up and lay something else. My best friend had real wooden slats covering most of her downstairs walls, as well as the floors to match. It reminds me of a Swiss chalet, with all the wood!! It's each to their own though. It depends on how you dress a room. Bare floors can look OK if you want a minimalistic look.
User avatar
Ice.Maiden
Golden Poster
Golden Poster
 
Posts: 70045
Joined: 14 Aug 2009, 23:31
Location: Peak District

Re: Apostrophes

Postby Kellemora » 15 Jun 2013, 15:22

Hi Icey

Although since my heart attack, I am very limited to what I could do now.
When I was younger, in some cases much younger, hi hi.....
When doing things like floors, I never looked at anything considered long lasting.
Although I did use REAL 3/4 inch thick tongue and groove Red Oak for hardwood floors.
I'm more or less talking about kitchens and bathrooms. Where you used sheet vinyl or tile.
The more you spend on something, the longer you plan on keeping it.
Even when you are tired of it, styles change, or you may have damaged an area when it was near new and just lived with the damage, due to the high cost you paid for it.

Although I could easily repair most damage, including in the real oak floors. As far as vinyl floors went, I bought cheap, but something I really liked. This gave us the opportunity to change how the kitchen or bathroom looked on a whim, without going broke doing it. Same thing with the tile on the kitchen walls. I hate wallpaper, so would use real tile. And never gave a second thought to knocking it off and replacing it.

But times have changed. When I did our bathroom, I have several tiles in there that cost over 4 bucks each little piece.
I did go with a better vinyl floor, but when it goes south, I will use a commercial laminate vinyl like I did in the kitchen.
Although I hear they don't make it the way they made the kind I have in my kitchen, because it is too easy to fix a bad spot.
If a laminate wood floor does get damaged, you almost have to take the whole floor up and put it back down again. Heck, if you are going to do that, go with another style or color and upgrade the rooms at the same time.

People laughed at me when I rented an apartment and spent three months renovating it before I moved in. I planned on being there at least five years or longer, so I went with some fairly expensive stuff. It all held up the entire time I was there. And because I handled things like that. My rent was the lowest of anyone and never raised. I saved double the cost of the renovations in lower rent. When the going price for an apartment the size of mine was 250 to 275 bucks a month, my fixed price was $112.50 locked for as long as I stayed there, or for ten years, when it would go up by 20% for another ten years.
Darn, no, I couldn't sublet, when the time came to move, hi hi.....
User avatar
Kellemora
Brainiac Class Poster
Brainiac Class Poster
 
Posts: 3389
Joined: 07 Jul 2012, 18:52
Location: From St. Louis, current Knoxville, TN

Re: Apostrophes

Postby Ice.Maiden » 16 Jun 2013, 08:30

Hi Gary,

You did well with your rented apartment, and yes, it was a pity you couldn't sub-let - well .... legally, that is! : )

As to floors and walls, yes I hear what you're saying. One of our bathrooms has ... well ... I don't quite know how to describe it, but I bet you'll know what I mean. It comes in a roll, as would vinyl, but it's heat-sealed into place. It's water-resistant, won't lift, won't split, and has a warm feeling to it when you walk on it in bare feet, so ideal for a bathroom really, although I almost cover it with deep-pile washable rugs. To clean it, you simply run a damp mop over it, and it dries very quickly, so unlike tiles, there are no residual marks or loss of shine, etc. The only problem is, that it seems to come in dull colours, so my husband chose black, saying that most any other colour'd go with it - i.e. bath mats, towels, curtains or whatever. It sounded gross when he first suggested it, but it looks great now it's down, and it's practically maintenance-free.

I bet your red oak floors looked fabulous. I love oak, preferably in dark shades, and I'm not one for a lot of change, so once tiles or whatever are down, they remain like that for years. I'd never change our oak floorboards. They're quite old, but beautiful, and because I prefer classic furniture to modern stuff, the two go hand in hand. I also like long curtains (drapes) with scalloped pelmets or scarves. Not to everyone's liking, but I like rooms to look rich and classy. It's not a look that you can change every year or two - or one which you'd want to. It'd cost a lot, and take character from the rooms. This takes time to develop.

I don't like wallpaper either, but we haven't got many places where we could use it anyway. We do, however, have one upstairs room which has it. It's very old, and had to be specialist cleaned. The inks used on ancient papers aren't like those we have today, so are liable to run or fade, and as I wanted to keep it, it needed treating properly.

Tiles are the same with me. Unlike yourself, I'm happy with the coverings we have, and they won't be changed. Some of the floor area's covered in granite, the rest's wood. The stone slabs are down for the duration, and there's a small room at the back that had quarry tiles laid. Some people don't like them, but I do.

I think we all have our own ideas on decor. A modern complex'd look stupid if it was filled with antiques and time-unchanged stuff, but older places look best in keeping with the original basics. Of course, you put modern electrical items in, blah blah, but then that's it. We all have our own ideas on what looks good though. I have a friend who lives in a very old place in the grounds of what used to be a private hall. This's now been taken over by some Trust, but her home remains as it was. It's tastefully furnished, apart from one room, which's full of modern furniture and gadgets. The furniture looks all wrong somehow, but she likes it that way, and so who's anyone else to criticise? A home's what you make it, and what suits those who live in it.
User avatar
Ice.Maiden
Golden Poster
Golden Poster
 
Posts: 70045
Joined: 14 Aug 2009, 23:31
Location: Peak District

Re: Apostrophes

Postby Kellemora » 16 Jun 2013, 10:39

There were only a few times when my home furniture didn't look like early orange crate, hi hi.....
My second apartment after I was married, the one mentioned above.
And my house in Creve Coeur as it neared the final renovation process.
The house here is slowly coming together. As I can afford to do each thing.
It is hard doing anything anymore, both money wise and health wise.

The house I live in right now, has numerous structural problems that can only be solved by a complete demolition and rebuild. That don't mean it will fall down around us. It will probably stand another hundred years. However, unlike our old homes in St. Louis that were built solid and true. The homes here were built using whatever sparse materials they had available, and with no building codes at the time. They were not meant to hold up longer than perhaps 25 years and many are now pushing 70 years old.

The roof rafters are only 2x4s on 24 inch centers, so they sag. The ceiling joists are the same, so they sag.
The floors were 2x6s on 24 inch centers so they sag in the middle, and the whole house is out of plumb, both horizontally and vertically.
When I bought the house, I wanted to run a chain saw around the perimeter, drop the floors and rebuild all new flooring using 2x12s, then remove the roof, raise the perimeter walls a couple of feet and install a truss roof. I could have afforded it at the time I suggested it. However, we would have needed a place to live, and the city wouldn't let us use the garage. So I just began doing the house, one room at a time. This is the most expensive way to do it. And it is fraught with all kinds of problems. However, as I did each room, it was done to perfection. All new wiring with many conveniences, telephone, cable TV and Cat5e at the time for computers. We are not at a loss for plugs and all of our light switches were added for the highest possible convenience.
Heck, just in our tiny bathroom, I have more switches than carters has pills. To the left of the entry door is a switch that turns on the ceiling light and the upper light bar above the front center three door medicine cabinet. A second dimmer type switch controls the lighting on each side of the center medicine cabinet. To your right is a switch that turns on a 1500 watt ceiling heater, and another switch to turn on an exhaust fan. If you sit down on the commode, there is a switch by your left hand to turn on the exhaust fan, just in case you forgot to do it while you were at the sink. Both sets of lights in the bathroom are on different bus bars, so if half the electric goes out, you still have the other half to see by. There is also a night light in the bathroom, not powered by a switch, so when you run in there at 3AM, you don't have to turn on any lights. And there is an emergency light, that when the electric goes off, it goes on.
Our kitchen is similar, and done like I did my house in St. Loo. Inside the appliance garage is eight electrical outlets. Plus four outside of the appliance garage on each side of it. I should get around to writing my family newsletter, so I can send folks to see just how cool I designed our kitchen, considering the small space I had to work in.

The hailstorm really messed us up. Going three months without a roof, undid most of the work we did both inside and outside of the house. And then my heart attack really put the damper on my getting much more done for a long time.
User avatar
Kellemora
Brainiac Class Poster
Brainiac Class Poster
 
Posts: 3389
Joined: 07 Jul 2012, 18:52
Location: From St. Louis, current Knoxville, TN

Re: Apostrophes

Postby Ice.Maiden » 16 Jun 2013, 12:06

Aww, I can truly well imagine how difficult your illness, etc., has made things, but you know, maybe it's nature's way of telling you to slow down, and I think all things happen for a reason.

Your home sounds brilliant, and because you've done a lot of things yourself, not only have you the satisfaction of the personal touches, but it's saved you a lot of time and money. It'll come together Gary.

You always make me grin with your: *I have more switches than carters has pills.

I don't know what that means, but it just sounds funny.
User avatar
Ice.Maiden
Golden Poster
Golden Poster
 
Posts: 70045
Joined: 14 Aug 2009, 23:31
Location: Peak District

Re: Apostrophes

Postby kg » 16 Jun 2013, 15:47

Ice.Maiden wrote:You always make me grin with your: *I have more switches than carters has pills.

I don't know what that means, but it just sounds funny.


Ah, President Jimmy Carter! His personal and familial history is a piece of work! While he is not the oldest of all the living ex-Presidents (George H.W. Bush is his senior, but only by a few months), he is the earliest, having served as President from 1977-1981.

All considerations aside, one cannot help but admire his humanitarian work. He was and remains a key figure in the Habitat For Humanity project, which builds and provides homes for poor people, and has worked tirelessly as an emissary to countries in the Middle East, Southeast Asia, Africa, and elsewhere.

Jimmy Carter

His brother, Billy was quite a "colorful" character, and sometimes a bit of an embarrassment to the President. I still remember his line of beer..."Billy Beer," and had the misfortune to try it once. I ranked it among some of the most disgusting beers I ever tried! :doh: :P
User avatar
kg
Honored 10k Club Member
Honored 10k Club Member
 
Posts: 10656
Joined: 06 Sep 2007, 23:45
Location: Godfrey, IL.

Re: Apostrophes

Postby Ice.Maiden » 16 Jun 2013, 20:37

LOOOOOL!!! :lmao4:
User avatar
Ice.Maiden
Golden Poster
Golden Poster
 
Posts: 70045
Joined: 14 Aug 2009, 23:31
Location: Peak District

Re: Apostrophes

Postby Kellemora » 17 Jun 2013, 12:21

Carter's is a company that makes "Carter's Little Liver Pills". (Yes the period goes after the close quote in this case. I'm learning.)
I have no idea who buys them or uses them, but they have been around forever.

My little bathroom has a total of five wall switches. Not counting the rotary switches inside the medicine cabinet or the fan speed adjustment switch in the ceiling fan, or the safety thermal switches in the heating unit and it's blower.
Most homes have ONE, sometimes TWO wall switches in a bathroom. And if I put an on/off switch for the nightlight, I would have had six wall switches.

My front and back door wall lights, the wall light at my office door, and all three pole lamps down my driveway have no switches, they are controlled by independent dusk to dawn switches. If I wanted to switch control all the things I have running around here, I would probably need a 9 panel box at each door, hi hi......

When the inspector was inspecting the wiring in my bathroom, he looked at me and said "Do you know this wire is for a three-way switch?" "Yes sir I do, this switch will be twinned with a switch over there." They sent a different inspector after the wiring was completed and approved and the switches and outlets were installed, but not yet the cover plates, so they could see inside. "Hey fella, you have a three-way here, you'll have to change it." "Um, Mr. Inspector Sir, it has to be a three-way switch and you'll not that it is also 30amp rated, not 15amp, as required by the code book for this installation." "Where does it go?" "Over to that switch right there, Sir." "Now let me see if I have this right. Both of these switches operate the exhaust fan." "Yes Sir, that is correct." "They are less than three feet apart." "Actually four and one-half feet." "If you have a switch here, why on earth do you need another one right there?" "Because if I'm at the mirror after a shower and need the fan, it's right here. But if I sit down on the commode and forgot to flip the fan on over there, I can turn it on while seated, without getting up." "Now that makes a lot of sense. Not a bad idea at all. But why didn't you just wire the fan to the light, if the lights on, the fan is on?" "I believe doing that no longer passes code." "Oh yeah, you're right!"

I've slowed down about as slow as I can go. I sit at my desk from 8AM until 11PM, except for eating and taking tinkle breaks.
User avatar
Kellemora
Brainiac Class Poster
Brainiac Class Poster
 
Posts: 3389
Joined: 07 Jul 2012, 18:52
Location: From St. Louis, current Knoxville, TN

Re: Apostrophes

Postby Ice.Maiden » 17 Jun 2013, 16:40

:lmao4: Fantastic!
User avatar
Ice.Maiden
Golden Poster
Golden Poster
 
Posts: 70045
Joined: 14 Aug 2009, 23:31
Location: Peak District

Previous

Return to Writers Corner

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest

cron