babushkas of chernobyl

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babushkas of chernobyl

Postby pilvikki » 20 Sep 2014, 18:18

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Re: babushkas of chernobyl

Postby Kellemora » 21 Sep 2014, 13:10

Quite a long read, but very interesting.
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Re: babushkas of chernobyl

Postby pilvikki » 21 Sep 2014, 14:17


I found it most enlightening.
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Re: babushkas of chernobyl

Postby Ice.Maiden » 21 Sep 2014, 15:02

That WAS interesting to read, although I think the babushkas're foolhardy.

I can well understand why they didn't want to leave their homes and land, but although they've managed to survive, it is, perhaps because of where the pockets of radiation fell. The soil's mostly contaminated, but radiation exposure doesn't have to show immediate effects, and as each resident dies of old age - or strokes, as it appears - they probably think they've escaped the radiation poisoning, whereas in fact it could've contributed to their demise.

Strontium-90 and caesium-137 which were released after the Chernobyl accident, have a half life of 30 years and 8 days, respectively. The babushkas've lived beyond the former time, so as with other elements released, perhaps they've managed to survive and're now in a "safer" period, although the Russian government says that people'll be affected for generations to come. Thyroid cancer and associated problems've become very common.

Where humans and animals can be mobile, their chances of survival're higher. Cows' milk became very contaminated, but certain plants and crops managed to keep growing, and much of the clay-type soil meant that the caesium couldn't be well absorbed. Perhaps these people rotated their growing areas, and've been lucky not to've been affected as much as in other places. I very much doubt that happiness alone's the reason that these people've managed to stay alive, but with not worrying about their predicament, it might play a part in keeping them going to ripe old ages.

Their happiness's obviously helped them tackle the trauma of what happened, but it could also be a case of "ignorance's bliss", and so they just continue with their lifestyles in the way that they've always been used to, and don't give much thought to what damage's still being done.

Note that all these people're getting on in years now. Had their children and grandchildren remained in the area, they could be now seeing the effects of what radiation has on the body, such as weak bones, infertility, leukamemia and so on, and people can live with the latter two conditions for quite a while. I wonder if post mortems're done on each resident as they pass away? That might indicate whether the radiation has any impact on their demise.
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