Every Single Satellite Orbiting The Earth

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Re: Every Single Satellite Orbiting The Earth

Postby Kellemora » 22 Oct 2014, 12:03

An eye and distance perception test is part of our drivers license renewal program.
Shame they don't ask a couple of pertinent questions along with the renewal tests.
Like, do you know what lane you are supposed to drive in, and do you?
Do you have any idea what that lever sticking out of the left side of your steering wheel column is for?
Do you know how to use it? Do you use it?
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Re: Every Single Satellite Orbiting The Earth

Postby Ice.Maiden » 22 Oct 2014, 14:32

:lmao1:
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Re: Every Single Satellite Orbiting The Earth

Postby pilvikki » 23 Oct 2014, 13:15


actually... the way the cars are built nowadays, that lever, so proudly sitting there all by it's lonesome for decades now has so much company I still can't remember how exactly use the windshield wipers and when not used them for a while and now in a hurry - I'll have front and back going and randomly spraying every which way...

:roll:
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Re: Every Single Satellite Orbiting The Earth

Postby Ice.Maiden » 23 Oct 2014, 14:47

Oh LOOOL!!!! Love it!!
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Re: Every Single Satellite Orbiting The Earth

Postby Kellemora » 24 Oct 2014, 11:26

My car is so old, I'm surprised the dimmer switch isn't still on the floor, hi hi...

When I first started driving, the Starter was a round pedal next to the gas pedal.
I won't admit to how many cars I had to crank, but that was before I was old enough to drive legally.
We just had a lot of really old stuff on our farm, including one-lungers.
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Re: Every Single Satellite Orbiting The Earth

Postby Ice.Maiden » 24 Oct 2014, 14:05

One-lungers??
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Re: Every Single Satellite Orbiting The Earth

Postby Kellemora » 25 Oct 2014, 11:30

The old flywheel engines with the open water trough on top to keep it cool.

I don't have time to snag a photo today, I'm off to the NaNoWriMo Kick-off picnic.
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Re: Every Single Satellite Orbiting The Earth

Postby Ice.Maiden » 25 Oct 2014, 17:34

Hope you had a good time Gary!

I just can't imagine any engine with an open water trough ..... : (
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Re: Every Single Satellite Orbiting The Earth

Postby Kellemora » 26 Oct 2014, 10:57

I'll go did you up a photo.
I just clicked on Google and it wished me a Happy Birthday! The Google Banner was a row of birthday cakes. In other words, Google is TRACKING ME, hi hi...

I just found one like was used on our farm to pump water to the Skinner Lines, a massive sprinkling system. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zXGiPoAN1eY

I have not been able to find one like I want to show you, and I'm on the old computer, so will jump over to my new computer and come back.
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Re: Every Single Satellite Orbiting The Earth

Postby Kellemora » 26 Oct 2014, 11:12

OK I found one that looks like the majority of the ones we had on our farm.
The owner did not run this one, but he talks about it.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sYn25QamZ08

HERE we go. Found one RUNNING, although it runs smoother than the ones we had, these are the type motors I was raised around. OSHA would have a heart attack if they saw something like this in a business today, hi hi...

The tank at the top is where the water for cooling is placed. These still have the oilers too!
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UQ64GZDYf9g

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Re: Every Single Satellite Orbiting The Earth

Postby Ice.Maiden » 26 Oct 2014, 17:13

:lmao1: Ingenious!!!

Well thanks for those Gary. Everything looks as though it came out of the Ark - but it holds a certain fascination, even though I've not seen much like that in real life. :cool2:
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Re: Every Single Satellite Orbiting The Earth

Postby pilvikki » 26 Oct 2014, 18:40


OSHA would have a heart attack if they saw something like this in a business today, hi hi...


no kidding!

but it sure sounds smooth and is really cool to watch.

:dance:

thanks!
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Re: Every Single Satellite Orbiting The Earth

Postby Ice.Maiden » 26 Oct 2014, 18:51

Those old contraptions intrigue me, but I wouldn't like to've been a mechanic and had to repair any!
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Re: Every Single Satellite Orbiting The Earth

Postby pilvikki » 26 Oct 2014, 19:10


ah, but see that's the beauty of them: very logical and easy access. compare this

[ img ]


to this:

[ img ]
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Re: Every Single Satellite Orbiting The Earth

Postby Ice.Maiden » 26 Oct 2014, 19:20

I feel ill looking at the bottom one! I mean ... what's everything do? LOOOOL - you can imagine how I am if I have to look under the bonnet of my car can't you!!
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Re: Every Single Satellite Orbiting The Earth

Postby Kellemora » 27 Oct 2014, 11:35

They were not as hard to work on as one would think. They really didn't have many parts, and almost all of the parts were on the outside where you could get to them easily.

Well, except when they stuck them in something like a small cement mixer, or sprayer trailer.

My uncle John blew one up by accidentally using gasoline in one designed for diesel.
We don't really think he did it, he just got blamed for it, hi hi...

Grandpa never threw anything away, not even cars, trucks or tractors.
This is how I came to learn to drive in a Ford model BB truck, and my first car was a '46 Ford Deluxe.
He made flat-top wagons we called whoopies, the tops were a little above waist high, for standing at working as we moved from aisle to aisle along the greenhouses. The undercarriages were frames from Model-T's and Model-As, and who knows all what else. Some were so old they had wood or metal spoke wheels with solid rubber tires. I was raised around all this olde stuff, and found much of it intriguing.

Water powered hydraulic pistons to swing the Skinner Lines for sprinkling crops. Self-powered Water Rams for pumping water up into the water tower. Noisy little things! When I was very young, we still used draft horses to pull plows and wagons around the farm. We had tractors too, but sometimes we didn't have the implements to use with the tractors. Besides, by using the plow teams, they could get by with using us kids as child slave labor. Each of us always had a certain amount of chores to ensure got done, both on the farm and at home. I wouldn't trade my life for anything in the world.

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Re: Every Single Satellite Orbiting The Earth

Postby Ice.Maiden » 27 Oct 2014, 14:15

I don't blame you re. the last bit Gary. It's lovey that you've seen so many changes, and stuff that today's youngsters might NEVER see.

Well now I know what a "one-lunger" is, and if it ever cropped up, I'd be able to give a brief description. I think the past's just as important as the future, and it saddens me when wonderful artefacts're found, yet no one knows what their true purpose was, etc.

Once we let go of our history - it's more-or-less gone, and people don't care any more, because there's no need to. Sure, we have records and pics of today's inventions, but if the world was to blow up and life returned in millions of years, none of this stuff'd be self-explanatory, and our languages'd be useless. Folk ought to write books, with step-by-step instructions that need no words, and which show the finished article and what it can do. It's no good putting everything on a computer - future life forms'd probably have no idea of how to work them.
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Re: Every Single Satellite Orbiting The Earth

Postby Kellemora » 28 Oct 2014, 10:52

I hear ya Icey...

I had a tool named "Ford Dowser Balls," which belonged to my grandfather.
I knew what it was and how to use it, because grandpa showed me.
I also used it quite often when restoring old houses with metal screen embedded lath and plaster.

I showed it around to most of the contractors I worked with and none, not even the oldsters, ever saw such a device. And many of them lived when it was most popular too.

And if I use the word I to start another sentence I will scream.

When the internet was young, I tried searching for it several times. Nothing ever came up. Checked about five or seven years ago, still nothing. But if you check today, you'll get hundreds of hits. I often wonder if I'm the one who stirred the pot by talking about it on-line?

I guess I was just lucky that as new things came on the scene and commonly used, grandpa was one not to clean out the warehouses and just let stuff accumulate for almost a century. Plus he had things given to him by his father and grandfather stashed in his closets for safe keeping.

Long before calculators, my job entailed using slide rules, so I had a very nice one. We also had an early hand cranked calculator called a Friden Machine. Once you learned to use it, it saved a lot of doing math on paper. The way we did things changed quite rapidly over the years, as each new method sprung up.
But it seems some areas of technology suddenly came to a standstill, with the only technological advances being in the peripherals used with the devices.

Take making duplicate copies of a document for example.
We had to hand make a new document using aniline dye on a sheet of paper, reversed. This worked like installing a piece of carbon paper backwards, behind the page you were typing. This paper was then laid on a tray filled with gel, its name, Heyer Hectograph. Later on color dyes were used so we had more than the old purple pages like your exams at skewl.
This was followed by a duplication machine. It used the same steps to make the new document, except instead of a dye page, the paper itself lost its bulk where the letters were struck. This made a stencil, almost like silkscreen. This was placed over a self-inking pad or on a roller, like the A.B. Dick machines. Ink flowed through the letter holes in the page onto a clean sheet of paper, almost like printing with type. The fancy machines were very similar to offset printing, except the ink came through the type, instead of being placed on the mask for each printing cycle.
Then of course came the offset press. Since it's invention, the only changes have been to how the printing masks are made. Offset is still the primary method of printing in use today.

Direct copies of printed pages started when thermal paper was developed. Thermal paper is still used today in most cash register receipt printers. After almost dying out when the FAX era came to a close. Xerox type copiers became the mainstay of every business, and are still popular, although most now work more like scanner/printers than as true direct imaging to a drum. Laser printers still use something similar to a drum, most have a drum and carrier. But direct laser to treated paper is emerging. Often only used in the photographic industry when ink jets just won't cut it. But as the price drops, I'm sure we will soon have toner free laser printers which use treated paper to capture the beam directly.
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Re: Every Single Satellite Orbiting The Earth

Postby Ice.Maiden » 28 Oct 2014, 19:01

It's wonderful Gary.

You see, you're right about today's technology. It's advancing so quickly, that in another 50-60 years, everything we use today'll be obsolete, but I think it's a shame.

The "old things" which you saw, or learnt how to use're the fore-runners of what we have today. Someone obviously looked at these things and thought: Hang on, I can make a better and more modern/easier - whatever - and did do. Great in many ways, but sad that all the careful thought which went into old machines and the like're now no longer necessary, because that part of history's exactly what it says - history.
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Re: Every Single Satellite Orbiting The Earth

Postby Kellemora » 29 Oct 2014, 13:43

I see one great hazard coming in the future.

As computers handle more and more of the designs, and people know less and less about how things are made. Computers are also used to control the manufacturing of all this micro-miniature irreparable things. They basically print the circuits using very exacting techniques.

When all this technology is wiped out by a solar flare or something, and no one knows how the computers continually reprogrammed themselves to get where they grew to.

We will be back in the dark ages, trying to reinvent the wheel, because nobody remembers how to make one anymore.
Heck, only fifty years ago, most folks knew how to fix almost anything they owned. Although they probably hired someone to do it for them, they still knew how to fix most things.
Today, it takes someone who specialized in something, and really all they do is replace whole assemblies, not even just small parts. A diode goes bad in an alternator, they replace the whole alternator. A capacitor goes bad on a circuit board, they replace the whole circuit board.
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